[ Updated threads · New messages · Members · Forum rules · Search · RSS ]
  • Page 1 of 1
  • 1
Forum » New Posts
New messages
adminDate: Wednesday, 21.08.2019, 04.28.54 | Message # 1
Forum: Film Cameras | Thread: OLYMPUS AZ 1 ZOOM
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
First Part find: http://camera-pedia.com/blog/olympus_az_1_zoom/2019-08-21-11
I ended up testing this camera twice. I forgot that I had already used it for a day out in Tokyo and then took it to a local shrine another day. That is why I decided not to buy any cameras until I have gone through the ones I have.






This camera has a lot of functions for a point and shoot. Even the flash has 4 different settings. According the the official Olympus website this camera came out in 1987 and was the first Olympus camera with a zoom lens, ooooh. The zoom is 35-70mm. The macro feature means you can focus at 1m, which isn’t really macro now, but I guess it was amazing at the time. One of the features I did try is the multi exposure on the top. To make that work you press that button while pressing the shutter, it stops the film advancing. If you look at the photos below you will see one example of this. I kind of forgot to use some of the functions. I did use the auto flash which worked very well.
This camera feels like a brick, without a battery it is 400g. As for the photos, it did ok. It is not the best, not the sharpest, but it is fun to try all the buttons and switches.
As mentioned I first took it to Hachiko Crossing in Shibuya. This was my first attempt at this kind of street photography and I was very self conscious. I definitely need more practice at this style. Plus it was a dull, rainy day. Not a great combination.



















The second outing was to a local shrine. I also made a mistake when processing. I heard my timer beep then poured out the developer 30 seconds from the end…I was on auto pilot, I should have agitated. Oops, lesson learned. It was also a dull, drizzly day.















Meh, it is ok. It doesn’t rock my boat.
As I have no intention of keeping a million cameras and I just like trying out cameras then selling them, I am sometimes in a quandary. I went wombling this week and saw another samurai for $3 and I knew I could sell it for a profit, but I had just posted the same camera here. What to do? Buy or leave? In the end I decided to leave it, but now I regret it. I guess I have to decided the whole purpose of this hobby. Is it the selling or the playing? If it is the selling then I should buy cameras I find that will make a profit. If it is trying, then I should leave cameras I have already tried.
As for this camera keep or sell – neither. If you would like this camera just send me a message. You pay the postage and the camera is yours for free. If I have hear nothing before the end of June 2016 I will give it back to a junk bin.
More at:https://cameragocamera.com/2016/03/14/olympus-az-1-zoom/
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 03.12.13 | Message # 2
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
12 PM GMT: Olympus has today announced the new C-4040Z. Based on the popular and successful C-3040Z / C-3030Z body and design the new C-4040Z increases the pixel count with the new 1/1.8" 4.1 megapixel CCD we've seen on Sony's DSC-S85. It has the same F1.8 - F2.6, 3x optical zoom lens as used on the C-3040Z (though now with a rubber barrel grip). There's also now the addition of a 7.7 megapixel interpolated mode (in-camera) and a noise reduction system. Burst shooting speed is 2 frames per second for up to 8 images. Street price $1099.
(Scroll down - below specifications for the Press Release).
Olympus C-4040Z Specifications
Sensor1/1.8" 4.1 megapixel CCD (effective 3.98 megapixels)Image Sizes2272 x 1704, 2048 x 1536, 1600 x 1200, 1280 x 960, 1024 x 768, 640 x 480"Englargement Mode"3200 x 2400, 2816 x 2112Image QualityTIFF, JPEG (three levels)Lens3x optical zoom (35 - 105 mm equiv.), F1.8 - F2.6Digital ZoomSmooth up to 2.5xMeteringESP, Spot, Multi-SpotExposure modesProgrammed Auto, Aperture Priority Auto, Shutter Priority AutoExposure compensation+/-2 EV in 0.3 EV stepsShutter speedsAuto: 1 - 1/800 sec
Manual: 16 - 1/800 secApertureWide: F1.8 - F10 (1/3 EV steps)
Tele: F2.5 - F10 (1/3 EV steps)Exposure bracketing3 or 5 images in 0.3, 0.7 or 1.0 EV stepsFocusingTTL "iESP" contrast detection, Manual focusFocus rangeNormal: 0.8 m - Infinity
Macro: 0.2 - 0.8mSensitivityAuto, ISO 100, 200, 400ViewfinderOpticalLCD1.8", 114,000 pixelsFlashInternal, range: Wide: 0.8 - 5.6 m, Tele: 0.2 - 3.8 mFlash modesAuto (automatic activation in low and backlight), Red-eye reduction, Off (no flash), Fill-in (forced activation). Slow synchronization (first-curtain synchronization effect, second-curtain synchronization effect) External terminal: Off, Auto, Forced activation.External flashYes, Olympus proprietary terminalBurst mode2 fps up to 8 frames (HQ mode)Self timer12 secondsPower4 x AA batteries or 2 x CR-V3 LithiumDimensions110 x 76 x 70 mm (4.33 x 2.99 x 2.75 in)Weight (no batt.)320 g (11.3 oz)Good news! State Street Direct, our official affiliate are now taking pre-orders for
the C-4040Z. You can order yours today.


All orders contribute to the upkeep of this site.
Press release:
OLYMPUS ANNOUNCES THE NEW CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM 4 MEGAPIXEL DIGITAL CAMERAFeatures Latest CCD, Super Bright Lens and Noise Reduction Technology for High Quality Digital Photos up to 16" x 20"

June 20, 2001, Melville, NY — Olympus America, Inc., the world leader in film and filmless photography, today announced the CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM. Establishing a new high-end category for Olympus C-Series cameras, the C-4040 ZOOM builds on the foundation of Olympus’ award winning C-Series digital cameras while incorporating exciting new features. The C-4040 ZOOM offers a 4 Megapixel CCD, a super-bright F1.8 high-performance 3X zoom lens, plus the latest in Olympus image quality and noise reduction technologies to deliver crisp high-quality prints as large as 16" x 20".

The C-4040 is the perfect digital camera for photographers desiring extensive image control capabilities combined with ease of use for creative and artistic applications. Professional photographers will also find the C-4040 ZOOM to be a versatile yet compact solution providing the image quality and output sizes required for magazine and newspaper publication.

Its high-performance 3X zoom lens offers a large aperture that opens to a maximum F1.8 aperture setting for low light photography. Combined with its extended flash working range, the C-4040 ZOOM is a great camera for any low-light shooting situation. Simple to use, the C-4040 ZOOM also features Olympus’ USB Auto-Connect capabilities for fast and worry-free downloading without the need for any additional software or drivers.

Similar in design to other Olympus C-Series models, the C-4040 ZOOM has an elegant all-black finish and rich ornamental parts that complement new ergonomic controls, including a rubberized lens barrel and grip. The C-4040 ZOOM also retains many popular features found in the C-Series, such as Auto and Manual White Balance, multiple exposure settings to compensate for different lighting conditions, a two-frame-per-second Burst Mode, QuickTime Movie, black and white and sepia shooting modes, Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB), and several compression settings.

New Features of the C-4040 ZOOM include:
  • Noise Reduction System – The noise reduction system allows for +/- 5-step sharpness and contrast control for clearer, more precise images. The camera compares similar images and uses that information to minimize background noise in pictures, even during long exposures or in low light conditions
  • Super Bright Lens – From wide-angle to telephoto settings, the new super-bright 7.1 - 21.3mm 3X zoom lens (35-105mm equivalent in 35mm photography) captures images with unrivaled precision. The 3X optical zoom also allows offers a seamless 7.5X digital zoom to get even closer to the action. The lens permits users to take shallower depth of field images for greater portrait photo opportunities and more freedom in low-light situations.
  • Optimum Image Enlargement Mode - Enlarges images up to 3200 x 2400 pixels in SHQ or HQ mode. The C-4040 ZOOM uses a bicubic algorithm and a new high-speed ASIC chip to maximize image quality and processing speed to create sharp, crisp pictures as large as 16" x 20".
  • Superior Image Quality – A 4.1 megapixel CCD and advanced imaging technology create exceptionally sharp, crisp high-resolution pictures.
  • User Friendly Interface – A streamlined menu with user-selectable shortcut menus and custom buttons make the camera easy to navigate and program.
  • USB Auto-Connect - Connect to any USB-compatible Windows computer (running Windows Me or 2000) or Macintosh (running MacOS 8.6+) for easy downloading of image files to computers without any additional software.
  • Designed Menu Navigation System – Never miss another moment fumbling through layers of camera settings. Custom buttons and shortcut settings make adjustments quick and easy.
  • Ruggedized Lens Barrel – The new ruggedized rubber grip around the lens barrel provides for surer handling in any weather condition, and protects the lens even without a cap. A tethered line ensures the lens cap is never lost when one is used.

Standard features of the C-4040 include:
  • Spot AF Function - A Spot AutoFocus function allows the camera to focus on points specifically selected by the photographer.
  • White Balance – Get exacting control over white balance settings in any lighting condition and ensure proper color reproduction. The iESP multi-patterned white balance system automatically adjusts system settings to deliver the best image quality, or select one of the four manual white balance presets for more precise control. In addition, a new +/-3 step white balance correction function enables minor adjustments in color tones.
  • Metering Modes - The C-4040 ZOOM offers users a choice of ESP multi-patterned metering and spot metering for easy, yet advanced exposure control. The ESP multi-pattern meter looks at a variety of areas in the subject area for proper overall exposure. Spot metering allows for pinpoint control of subject exposure using only the very center of the image area. The C-4040 ZOOM also includes a new Multi-Spot metering mode that combines up to eight spot reading positions and averages them together for total control over subject exposure. The C-4040 ZOOM’s versatile metering capabilities make it one of the most advanced models in the field of 4 Megapixel cameras.
  • Sharpness and Contrast Settings – Get the best possible pictures every time. Flexible sharpness and contrast controls let the photographer take full control of final output quality. Soft, Normal and Hard Sharpness settings adjust the definition around the subject to meet any need. Low to High Contrast control regulates dark and light areas to capture any image with just the right amount of contrast and depth.
  • QuickTime Movie with Sound - QuickTime Movie mode allows users to capture up to 120 seconds of video with simultaneously recorded sound. For still images, the C-4040 ZOOM lets users record a 4-second audio attachment, ideal for voice memos. Audio may be re-recorded over images, with functionality supported by Olympus’ CAMEDIA Master software.
 

Accessories

Olympus provides a wide range of optional accessories for the C-4040 ZOOM including a camera case; FL-40 external flash for synchronized shooting with TTL cable and bracket; an assortment of lenses from 28mm to 152mm equivalent; RM-1 remote control; NiMH batteries and charger; C7AU AC adapter.

The CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM will be available August 2001 with an estimated street price of $1099. It ships with an 16MB Olympus SmartMedia™ memory card, USB cable, AV cable, two 3V lithium battery packs (CR-3V), lens cap and retainer cord, remote control, Olympus Camedia Master 2.5 Utility Software for image manipulation and creation, instruction manual, QuickStart Guide, lens cap and strap.

C-4040 ZOOM Street Price $1099.

More Links about C-4040
http://olympuscanada.com/cpg_sec....mp;fl=4
https://www.yodot.com/mac-pho....om.html
http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Olympus_C-4000_Zoom
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.53.49 | Message # 3
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Sitting in front of a monitor all day (and all night for some of us) can make you lose sight of important current events such as the changing of the seasons. Fortunately, if you don't get out much, you can tell what time of year it is by the product releases you read. Motherboards? Must be Springtime (Computex). Game consoles? Must be time to do some Xmas shopping (online, of course). Well, it must be summer because we're seeing gads of new digital cameras coming out (a lot of folks take vacations this time of year, right?). Here's another: Olympus just let us know about its CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM digital camera. It has a 4 Megapixel CCD (similar to Toshiba's PDR-M81 ), an F1.8 3X zoom lens, and image quality and noise reduction technologies to let you print photos as large as 16" x 20". Other features include auto and manual white balance, multiple exposure settings, a two-frame-per-second burst mode, QuickTime Movie capabilities, black and white and sepia shooting modes, auto exposure bracketing (AEB), and several compression settings. The CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM will be available in August with an estimated street price of $1099. It ships with a 16MB Olympus SmartMedia memory card, USB cable, AV cable, two 3V lithium battery packs (CR-3V), lens cap and retainer cord, remote control, Olympus Camedia Master 2.5 Utility Software for image manipulation and creation, instruction manual, QuickStart Guide, lens cap, and strap. Now, slather yourself in SPF 30 and go smell the roses.
Read at: https://www.tomshardware.co.uk/olympus-camedia-c,news-3767.html
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.47.32 | Message # 4
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Color Series:Very Red
1/ 800
F/ 4
(794 k)Red
1/ 800
F/ 4
(771 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(817 k)Blue
1/ 800
F/ 4
(834 k)Very Blue
1/ 800
F/ 4
(862 k)
Lens Zoom RangeA pretty typical zoom range...We've received a number of requests from readers to take shots showing the lens focal length range of those cameras with zoom lenses. Thus, we're happy to present you here with the following series of shots, showing the field of view with the lens at full wide angle, the lens at full 3x telephoto, and the lens at full telephoto with 2x digital zoom enabled. The C-4040's lens covers a range equivalent to a 35-105mm zoom on a 35mm film camera. Following are the results at each zoom setting. Wide Angle
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(1296 k)3x Telephoto
1/ 650
F/ 2.6
(1316 k)2x Digital Zoom
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(967 k)
 Musicians Poster (1943 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceGood color in auto mode, good detail.For this test, we shot with the Auto (1943 k), Daylight (1956 k), and Manual (1960 k) white balance settings, choosing Auto as the most accurate. The Daylight came out rather warm, while the Manual setting produced a much cooler image with slightly pale, bluish skin tones. Color is good throughout the frame, with an accurate blue value on the Oriental model's robe (this blue has a tendency to go purple, a common problem with digicams, and we did notice slight purplish tints in the darker blue shades). Detail looks good throughout the frame, with a nice level of sharpness.
 Macro Shot (1813 k)Standard Macro ShotMacro with FlashGood close-up, excellent flash performance, for being this close!The C-4040 performed well in the macro category, capturing a minimum area of just 3.24 x 2.43 inches (82.22 x 61.66 millimeters). Resolution looks great, with nice detail in the coins and brooch, and color is reasonably accurate (though with a slight greenish cast). The flash (2012 k) did an excellent job throttling down for the macro area, with just a slight reflection in the large coin. (An unusually good job for a flash in macro mode.)
  "Davebox" Test Target (2396 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceGood color, but the reds and yellows are a little undersaturated. Excellent(!) shadow detail, low noise. Good overall.We shot samples of this target using the Auto (2450 k), Manual (2396 k), and Daylight (2466 k) white balance settings, choosing the Manual setting for our main image. (The Daylight shot was very warm, while the Auto shot had a slight magenta tint.) Exposure looks about right, as the overall colors are bright and the highlight details are strong. Color accuracy and saturation are good, though the large red and magenta color blocks appear cool. The C-4040 captured good detail in the shadows, with pretty low noise.
 Low-Light TestsVery good at low light, down to the limit of our test. Great for pictures of night scenes, dim interiors. Long-exposure noise reduction on the camera works very well.The C-4040 performed very well in the low-light category, and captured bright, usable images at light levels as low as 1/16 foot-candle (0.67 lux) at all three ISO settings. We shot with the camera's Noise Reduction setting at all light levels, which did an excellent job of decreasing the image noise. Interestingly, the shots taken at 1/16 foot-candle without Noise Reduction have a more accurate color balance, but the noise level is much higher. With Noise Reduction activated, we see practically no need for any noise removal software. The table below shows the best exposure we were able to obtain for each of a range of illumination levels. Images in this table (like all of our sample photos) are untouched, exactly as they came from the camera. Click here for sample images at ISO 100 (2301 k), 200 (2566 k), and 400 (2565 k) without Noise Reduction at the 1/16 foot-candle light level.1fc
11lux
1/2fc
5.5lux1/4fc
2.7lux
1/8fc
1.3lux
1/16fc
0.67lx
ISO
100

2,454.8 KB
1/ 1 secs
F2

2,500.0 KB
2 secs
F2

2,426.4 KB
5 secs
F2

2,298.4 KB
8 secs
F2

2,648.6 KB
16 secs
F2
ISO
200

1,838.0 KB
1/ 3 secs
F2

1,801.4 KB
1 secs
F2

1,892.1 KB
2.5 secs
F2

1,872.9 KB
5 secs
F2

2,045.8 KB
8 secs
F2
ISO
400

1,785.7 KB
1/ 6 secs
F2

1,783.0 KB
1/ 3 secs
F2

2,408.6 KB
1.3 secs
F2

2,358.1 KB
2.5 secs
F2

2,596.1 KB
4 secs
F2
 
Love high ISO photography? Hate noise? Check out Fred Miranda's ISO-R noise-reducing actions for Photoshop. Incredible noise reduction, with *no* loss of subject detail. (Pretty amazing, IMHO.) Check it out!


Flash Range TestFlash seems good out to the 14 foot limit of our test. (Very good)In our testing, we found the C-4040's flash bright and effective as far as 14 feet from the test target. Intensity decreased only slightly between the eight and 14 foot distances, noticeable mainly as a slight pinkish cast as the flash power dims. Below is our flash range series, with distances from eight to 14 feet from the target.8 ft9 ft10 ft11 ft12 ft13 ft14 ft
2,145.9 KB
1/ 800
F2.3

2,185.6 KB
1/ 650
F2.3

2,080.9 KB
1/ 500
F2.3

2,045.8 KB
1/ 500
F2.3

1,835.7 KB
1/ 400
F2.6

1,788.9 KB
1/ 400
F2.6

1,730.4 KB
1/ 320
F2.6

 ISO-12233 (WG-18) Resolution Test (1988 k)Strong detail to 1,100 lines (good). More than average barrel distortion at wide angle though, and a bit more chromatic aberration than we like to see, in the far corners, at wide angle.The C-4040 performed well on our "laboratory" resolution test chart. It started showing artifacts in the test patterns at resolutions as low as 700 lines per picture height, in both horizontal and vertical directions. We found "strong detail" out to at least 1,100 lines. "Extinction" of the target patterns didn't occur until about 1,300 lines. We also shot at the interpolated 2,816 x 2,112- (3462 k) and 3,200 x 2,400-pixel (4141 k) resolutions, noticing slightly softer details and decreased resolution.Optical distortion on the C-4040 is higher than average at the wide angle end, as we measured an approximate 0.91 percent barrel distortion. The telephoto end fared much better, as we found only one pixel of pincushion distortion. Chromatic aberration is moderate, showing about two or three pixels of coloration on both sides of the target lines, which are somewhat distorted from the slight corner softness. While only a couple of pixels in breadth, there's more color there than we like to see. (This distortion is visible as a very slight colored fringe around the objects at the edges of the field of view on the resolution target.)Resolution Series, Wide AngleGiant / Uncompressed
Note: Download and view in imaging software.
(11,357 k)Giant / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.6
(1988 k)Giant / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(760 k)
Large / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(2166 k)Large / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(586 k)
Medium1 / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(1046 k)Medium1 / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(371 k)
Medium2 / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(741 k)Medium2 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(225 k)
Small / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(431 k)Small / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(146 k)
Tiny / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(132 k)Tiny / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(64 k)Resolution Series, TelephotoGiant / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.6
(2452 k)
Viewfinder Accuracy/Flash Uniformity


Average optical VF accuracy, excellent LCD accuracy. Flash is uneven at wide angle, excellent at telephoto.The C-4040's optical viewfinder was a little tight, showing approximately 83 percent frame accuracy at wide angle, and about 85 percent at telephoto. The LCD monitor fared much better, showing approximately 98 percent of the image area at wide angle, and almost exactly 100 percent at telephoto. Since we generally like to see LCD monitors as close to 100 percent accuracy as possible, the C-4040 did an excellent job here. Flash distribution is rather uneven at the wide angle setting (though bright), with slight falloff along in the corners. At the telephoto setting, flash distribution is even, though the intensity is dimmer. 

Wide Angle (Optical)
1/ 200
F/ 1.8
(2528 k)
Telephoto (Optical)
1/ 100
F/ 2.6
(2681 k)
Wide Angle (LCD)
1/ 200
F/ 1.8
(2255 k)
Telephoto (LCD)
1/ 100
F/ 2.6
(2638 k)
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.47.07 | Message # 5
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
We've begun including links in our reviews to a Thumber-generated index page for our test shots. The Thumber data includes a host of information on the images, including shutter speed, ISO setting, compression setting, etc. Rather than clutter the page below with *all* that detail, we're posting the Thumber index so only those interested in the information need wade through it!Outdoor Portrait (1771 k)Very sharp, good color (good skin, true blues), very little shadow noise. A great job all around!The extreme tonal range of this image makes it a tough shot for many digicams, which is precisely why we set it up this way. The object is to hold highlight and shadow detail without producing a "flat" picture with muddy colors, and the C-4040 performed well. The shot at right has a +0.7 EV exposure compensation adjustment, which brightened the midtones about as much as we felt we could without losing too many highlights. We shot this with the Auto (2085 k) white balance setting, as it resulted in more natural color than the Daylight (1809 k) white balance. (Daylight produced a much warmer image.) Color is very good, although skin tones are slightly magenta. The blue flowers look much better than what we see from most cameras, although there's still a hint of purple in them. (these blues are tough for digicams to get right). Excellent detail in the shadows, with low noise.Readers interested in seeing the effects of a range of exposure compensation settings are directed to the thumbnail page, and photos C44OUTAP0-4. These range from +0 to +1.3EV, in steps of 1/3 EV.
 Closer Portrait (2087 k)Excellent detail, good color. Some lost highlights though...Results are similar to the longer portrait shot above, with good color and resolution. The 3x zoom lens helps prevent distortion of the model's features, and more detail is visible than in the shot above. Skin tones again show a slight orange tint, but overall color looks nice. Shadow detail is great, with moderately low noise. Our main shot has no exposure adjustment at all, which still overexposes the highlight areas of the white shirt collar. (Olympus cameras have tended to have higher than average contrast in the past, the C4040 Zoom seems less so, but still struggles with the tonal range on this shot a bit.) The table below shows the results of a range of exposure settings from zero to +1.0 EV.Readers interested in seeing the effects of a range of exposure compensation settings on this shot are directed to the thumbnail page, and photos C44FACAP0-3. These range from +0 to +1.0EV, in steps of 1/3 EV.
 Indoor Portrait, Flash (2666 k)Flash is too dim in this shot without an EV boost, but does a good job when you tweak the power up a little.The C-4040's flash was slightly dim without any exposure compensation, but did a good job illuminating the subject when we cranked it up a bit. (We really like variable flash power as a digicam feature, it comes in very handy in settings like this.) The background incandescent lighting resulted in a strong magenta/orange color cast, which dissipated with each additional exposure adjustment. Color looks good with the brighter exposures, though the slight color cast persists. We chose the +1.3 EV exposure adjustment for our main series because it had the best lighting on the model, though the white shirt is overexposed. The table of small thumbnails below shows exposure series from zero to +1.3 EV.0 EV1.3 EVExposure Compensation Settings:0 EV

1/ 40
F/ 2
(2641 k)0.3 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2644 k)0.7 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2692 k)1.0 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2697 k)1.3 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2666 k)
Indoor Portrait, No Flash Auto White BalanceIncandescent White BalanceManual White Balance(2489 k)Manual white balance does well, but Auto and Incandescent do poorly. High noise, especially at ISO 400, but fairly fine-grained. Good job in Manual mode, but we'd like to see incandescent do better.This shot is always a very tough test of a camera's white balance capability, given the strong, yellowish color cast of the household incandescent bulbs used for the lighting, and the C-4040 produced good results with the Manual (2691 k) white balance setting. The Auto(1931 k) white balance setting was very orange, and the Incandescent(2005 k) setting produced a warm, sepia image. We selected an exposure adjustment of +1.3 EV for our main shot, which resulted in a good exposure with fairly accurate color. The blue flowers again show purplish tints, which is a common problem among digicams with this shot.Exposure Compensation Settings:0 EV
1/ 30
F/ 2
(2639 k)0.3 EV
1/ 25
F/ 2
(1920 k)0.6 EV
1/ 15
F/ 2
(1631 k)1.0 EV
1/ 15
F/ 2
(2688 k)1.3 EV
1/ 13
F/ 2
(2489 k)We shot a series of photos with the range of ISO settings the C4040 offers. The image noise was higher than we'd like to see in all cases (almost all blue-channel noise, surprisingly little red-channel), and was very high in the ISO 400 example. It is fairly fine-grained though, which makes it somewhat less objectionable. (We'd still like to see it lower though.)ISO Series:100 ISO
1/ 15
F/ 2
(1978 k)200 ISO
1/ 40
F/ 2
(1833 k)400 ISO
1/ 80
F/ 2
(1762 k)
House Shot (1856 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceVery good detail, very good color. Soft in the corners, but we'd give it a "very good" overall.Though the color balance is a hint magenta, we chose the Auto (1856 k) white balance setting for our main selection. The Manual (1898 k) setting produced very cool, greenish results, while the Daylight (1887 k) setting was much too warm. Detail looks great in the tree limbs and house front, with a slight softness at the corners of the frame. Noise is moderate in the roof shingles, and faintly noticeable in the window screens.
 Far-Field TestExcellent detail and sharpness, but the corners are a bit soft again. Loses the highlights, but does well in the shadows. Excellent fine-grained color& tone adjustments. Good job overall.This image is shot at infinity to test far-field lens performance. NOTE that this image cannot be directly compared to the other "house" shot, which is a poster, shot in the studio. The rendering of detail in the poster will be very different than in this shot, and color values (and even the presence or absence of leaves on the trees!) will vary in this subject as the seasons progress. In general though, you can evaluate detail in the bricks, shingles and window detail, and in the tree branches against the sky. Compression artifacts are most likely to show in the trim along the edge of the roof, in the bricks, or in the relatively "flat" areas in the windows.This is our ultimate "resolution shot," given the infinite range of detail in a natural scene like this. The C-4040 picked up great detail throughout the frame, though details are slightly soft, particularly in the corners. The fine foliage details are slightly softer than the perpendicular details of the house front, a common occurrence among digicams. We also measure a camera's dynamic range in this shot, and noticed that the C-4040 fell victim to the bright sunshine glare on the bay window, losing all but the strongest details. (And this was a somewhat hazy day, not as contrasty as this shot can be at times.) The shadow areas under the porch and in the shade of the tree (at right) fared slightly better, with fairly strong details visible in the brick and shrubbery patterns. The extreme contrast of the scene resulted in a slightly dim image as well. The table below shows our resolution and quality series, followed by ISO, contrast, sharpness, and white balance series. We also shot with the C-4040's two interpolated resolutions: 2,816 x 2,112 (3132 k) and 3,200 x 2,400 (5042 k) pixels.Resolution Series:Giant / Uncompressed
Note: Download and view in imaging software.
(11,357 k)Giant / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 5
(1906 k)Giant / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(837 k)
Large / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4
(1641 k)Large / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(672 k)
Medium1 / Fine
1/ 400
F/ 6.3
(1217 k)Medium1 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 5
(438 k)
Medium2 / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 5
(772 k)Medium2 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 5
(278 k)
Small / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4
(438 k)Small / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(179 k)
Tiny / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4.5
(164 k)Tiny / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(72 k)ISO Series:ISO 100
1/ 800
F/ 4
(1985 k)ISO 200
1/ 650
F/ 7
(1825 k)ISO 400
1/ 650
F/ 10
(1846 k)The C4040 Zoom gives you *very* fine-grained control over contrast, with a range of +/- 5 steps up and down from the default. We've skipped over most here, showing just representative points along the range. Check the thumbnail page to see the full range, files C44FARCON01-11. Very handy, we like fine-grained adjustments like this, that allow you to really customize the camera to your own preferences.Contrast Series:Very Low
1/ 400
F/ 6.3
(836 k)Low
1/ 800
F/ 4
(798 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(827 k)High
1/ 650
F/ 5
(821 k)Very High
1/ 650
F/ 5
(834 k)The same story on in-camera sharpening, a total of 11 settings. We don't see as big a need for lots of sharpening settings, but still handy to have nonetheless. Same story as above, a few links below, see the thumbnail page for the rest. (C44FARS01-11)Sharpness Series:Very Low
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2102 k)Low
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(1929 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2105 k)High
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2134 k)Very High
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2212 k)
There's also a very broad range of adjustment available for the auto and preset white balance settings. The menu option lets you push the color toward red or blue, with 7 steps in either direction. To our eye, only the first couple are really useful, we'd prefer to see the same number of steps spread over a (much) narrower range. Kudos for including the adjustment though! Same story as above, a few links below, see the thumbnail page for the rest. (C44FARS01-11) - It'd be interesting to see what a strong blue tweak on the incandescent setting would do for the warm-tone problems we saw above. - Didn't have time to try this though...
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.45.48 | Message # 6
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
The Olympus Camedia C-4040Zoom is one of several new 4 megapixel cameras entering the market, and therefore faces some strong competition. This model is in the top of the consumer range, retailing for around 800 and has some unique features. Some of its main features are listed below:
Main features

  • 3x multivariator zoom lens 7.1-21.3 mm, f/1.8-f/2.6, 10 lenses in 7 groups (equivalent to 35-105mm lens in 35mm camera).
  • 1/1.8 inch CCD solid-state image pickup 4.13million pixels (effective 3.98 million pixels).
  • 1.8 inch colour TFT LCD monitor with 114,000 pixels made of low-temperature poly-silicon. Brightness adjustment is possible.
  • Uses smartmedia cards.
  • 320g without batteries or Smart Media card.

What you get in the box:
  • C-4040Zoom camera
  • Strap
  • USB cable
  • Lens cap
  • Lithium battery CR-V3(2x)
  • RM-1 Remote control
  • AV cable (PAL)
  • Software CD-ROM

Handling
Handling is subjective, with things like hand-size and requirements influencing people's opinions. We all liked the Olympus, it feels solid and ergonomically friendly and we got positive feedback from friends who tried the camera too. The best thing about the feel is the large hand grip and overall light weight.
Compared to the Canon G2 we tested at the same time, the 
C-4040Z feels more comfortable. The grip on the G2 is smaller (shown in the animation to the right) and the camera feels unbalanced because of this. The Olympus grip feels very ergonomically friendly, but we'd always recommend you trying several cameras out for handling, as it's an often overlooked quality.
The camera comes with a remote control, which many manufacturers only offer as an optional extra. Great move Olympus, as it's really useful to use the remote instead of the timer mode for family shots where the photographer also wants to be in the frame. It's also good to use to prevent camera shake when the camera is mounted on a tripod.
As well as a shutter release the remote also has a zoom lens controller. Indoors the remote works fine up to eight meters with the camera facing you. This is reduced to about four meters outdoors. But when we tried to use the system to take pictures of some birds bathing in a stream about four meters away with the camera pointing away from the remote it wouldn't work. This is because the receiver is on the front of the camera and indoors can rely on light from the contoller bouncing of nearby walls to trigger, but outdoors it's useless. Manufacturers should consider placing the receiver somewhere where the remote can be used from any angle.
Menus
Digital cameras are often not the most user friendly devices, caused mainly by the wealth of features they can have and the difficulty in presenting all these to the user in a simple fashion. Manufacturers all have different systems of user interface, and they are applied with varying degrees of success. Having used many different digital cameras, I can say without a doubt the Olympus system is one of my favourites. They have added very useful features, such as customisable shortcuts which allow you to reconfigure the initial menu screen shown to the right (excludes mode menu):
The mode menu is divided into the following sections:
MenuFunction settings
Camera
Drive mode, ISO, A/S/M, Flash intensity, Slow flash, Noise reduction, Multi-metering, Digital Zoom, Fulltime AF, AF Mode, Sound, Panorama, Picture colour.
Picture
Record mode (Quality settings), White balance, Make colour bluer/redder, Sharpness, Contrast.CardFormat card.
Setup
All reset, Beep low/high/off, Record view on/off, File name reset/auto, Pixel mapping on/off, Monitor brightness, Date/time, Measurement units m/ft, Short cut, Custom button.Camera modes


On the top of the camera is the mode dial, this is easily switched while holding the camera with your right hand. It allows you to select from:
Program shooting: In this mode the camera automatically sets aperture and shutter speed.
A/S/M mode: Selecting this lets you select aperture, shutter speed or both at once.
Movie Record: Allows you to record movies in QuickTime format.
Play mode: For reviewing the shots you have taken.
The LCD display on the top of the camera is useful when you choose not to use the colour LCD screen. It shows information on the flash mode, focusing mode, flash intensity, battery level, white balance, ISO, Exposure compensation, Auto-bracket, macro mode, spot metering mode, shooting mode, record mode and number of pictures remaining.
Viewfinder and LCD screen
The viewfinder is a standard one with diopter adjustment, which I didn't find worked as well on some other cameras. The dipotre control wheel is tight and fiddly to set and the size of the viewfinder is small, making it uncomfortable to use.

The LCD screen, however, is bright and detailed allowing you to easily check the focus of shots. Unfortunately though it sticks out further than any other area on the back of the camera, so when placed down on a surface it can easily become scratched. You can adjust the brightness of the screen using the menu and turn it on or off using a button on the back of the camera.
Although the LCD screen is fixed, it has a very wide viewing angle. This means if you hold the camera say at 20cm up or down from eye level you can still see the display clearly. On some other cameras like the Nikon 885 you must hold the camera directly at eye level to see it clearly.
ConnectionsUnderneath a cover there is a DC-IN jack, A/V OUT jack (mono) and USB connector. On the side of the camera there is a covered 5-pin flash socket which has a screw on cover (taken off for this picture). No DC adaptor is provided with the camera, so this will have to be added to the cost if you want one.
Also shown in this picture is the diopter adjustment dial for the viewfinder and the protruding LCD screen.
Battery and SmartMedia compartments are to the right of the camera in the hand grip, aiding its weight distribution. Both holders are solidly built and easy to operate.Battery-life performance
The batteries provided are Lithiums, so are not rechargeable and no other batteries are provided. This means you have to budget the price of a rechargeable set of 4 AA batteries and a charger. We'd recommend you get some high capacity Ni-Mh batteries as these will give good performance. The supplied ones are best left as a backup so that if your rechargeables run out you don't miss that critical shot.

When using Ni-Mh batteries we obtained good performance. With one set of batteries lasting through a trip away of three days. This trip involved flash shots, many standard shots, and much reviewing of images on the LCD screen.
Image quality
There are a large amount of image quality settings, 17 in total. The image types are Tiff and JPG (SHQ, HQ). The resolutions available are 640x480, 1024x768, 1280x960, 1600x1200, 2048x1536, 2272x1704 and using interpolation 2816x2112 and 3200x2400.
We wanted to test if there were any advantages to using the camera's own interpolated mode. To do this we set up a test scene, and took two pictures, one in the true 2272x1704 size, and one in the interpolated 3200x2400 size. We then increased the size of the true file in Photoshop using bicubic interpolation, to compare the results side by side. Only a specific area of the original is shown in the below two pictures, this area is shown in the red square to the right.There is little difference between the two pictures, the 2272x1704 picture shows a minute amount more detail. For everyday purposes most people will want to use the true resolution of the CCD and save space on their memory card, the interpolated shot was 4.32Mb compared to 2.11Mb.
2272x1704 (increased using Photoshop bicubic interpolation to 3200x2400)C-4040Zoom internally interpolated 3200x2400Other people may want to use the benefits of the increased resolution for larger print sizes, and not want the inconvenience of editing their pictures before printing them.
One major issue we have with this camera, and it reflects heavily on the image quality is its lens. At first we were pleased to see f/1.8 on the specification, then on closer inspection of the resulting image quality we were less pleased. What we found particularly disappointing was the amount of lens movement when it was touched lightly, as most people do accidentally sometimes.Even cheaper cameras from other manufacturers do not have this much movement, and it's something we hope Olympus will rectify on future models.
Sample pictures

Shown on the right is an enlarged area of the picture above (highlighted by the red square).The purple areas are chromatic aberrations, and are quite distracting. However they are not visible on all shots taken with the camera, and could, with some effort, be edited out digitally.In other areas of the picture, colours are under saturated and dull. Detail is not as good as we'd hope for a camera costing this much, combined with a 4Mp CCD.

This house shot was taken at around 6pm, and the image highlighted in red to the bottom right shows approximately how dark it was. Using a one second exposure the camera has done a good job of capturing the scene, and the noise reduction has kept noise levels down well.

Setting the camera to its smallest aperture for this shot, we were disappointed by the softness of the trees and the bland colours. Looking at the results from other cameras for this shot we could clearly see the C-4040z is let down by its colour reproduction. One redeeming feature is that the camera's multi-metering worked well.

Using the manual mode for this shot we were able to set a shutter speed of 1/10sec resulting in a blurred effect with the water. The problem with colour reproduction remains and overall the photograph appears a little dull and soft.
Slightly over exposed the shot of this sculpture shows some more redeeming features of the 
C-4040z's image quality. Namely although not as sharp as some of the competition noise levels are low, and the camera achieved focus quite accurately and quickly, as it did in the majority of cases.

Verdict 
We found a lot to like about this camera, it handles very well and is easy to use. However the negative points concerning image quality cannot be overlooked. Unless you really want a 4Mp camera with a f/1.8 lens we'd recommend checking out the other contenders first. Namely the Sony DSC-S85 if you want to use memory sticks, and the Olympus C40z, Canon PowerShot S40 and Pentax Optio 430 if you would like something more compact. There is also the Canon PowerShot G2 if you'd like LCD swivel ability. If resolution is very important to you and price is not such a big concern, there are some 5 megapixel models out now as well.

Original article: https://www.ephotozine.com/article....ew-4288
 
PhotoClub7910Date: Friday, 09.08.2019, 23.50.32 | Message # 7
Forum: Education | Thread: HOW TO USE A DSLR CAMERA: A BEGINNER’S PHOTOGRAPHY GUIDE
Private
Group: Users
Messages: 1
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
So you’ve got yourself a new DSLR camera! Congratulations, there’s a whole world of photography possibilities about to open up to you. But you might be wondering, as you open up the box and check out the lengthy how-to manual, exactly how best to go about getting the best (the most?) from your new camera.
Well, I’m here to help. I’ve been shooting with a DSLR camera since I was thirteen years old, starting with a film Canon camera, and now on a professional full frame Canon digital body. I teach an online photography course, and have been lucky enough to help people all over the world get more out of their cameras.
In today’s post, I’m going to break down in simple terms the key features of your camera, and give you all the most useful tips that you need to get the most out of it.
This guide is written specifically perspective to help a new DSLR camera owner, but will also be largely applicable to those of you with a mirrorless camera. However, I’ll also be writing a similar guide for mirrorless cameras specifically in the coming months as there are some notable differences.
This post assumes no prior knowledge of cameras or photography, and hopefully will help you understand the features you have available to you, as well as get you out and shooting better photos quickly.
However, please don’t be frustrated if it takes a bit of time to master some of the concepts of photography. Photography is a skill that takes time to master, and many of the principles of photography are not necessarily obvious or intuitive. With time and patience though, it will become second nature!
I appreciate that the world of photography jargon can be a little overwhelming, so I’m going to start with the basics.
Contents:

  • What is a DSLR Camera?
  • DSLR Camera Controls: A Guide
  • How to Use Your DSLR Camera
  • How to Care for and Protect your New DSLR
  • Best DSLR Camera for Beginners
  • Further Reading


What is a DSLR Camera?A digital single lens reflex, or DSLR camera, is a camera with an internal mirror and prism system. This system is used to direct the light from the lens up to the viewfinder that you look through to compose the image.

I appreciate this may sound a little opaque, so let me break it down a bit.
All digital cameras essentially work in the same way. First, light is collected and focused by a lens, and then captured on a digital sensor. The sensor saves that light information into an image file that you can view and edit.
The difference between a DSLR camera and the other cameras on the market today is that a DSLR has this mirror and prism system which is used to send light to the viewfinder. If you take the lens off a DSLR and look inside the lens mount, you’ll see the mirror sitting at around a 45 degree angle. It’s just reflecting the light up towards the optical viewfinder.
When you press the shutter button, the mirror will flip up inside the camera, out of the way of the sensor. Then the light will pass onto the sensor to record the image. This is why, when you take a photo with a DSLR camera, the viewfinder goes dark when you press the shutter button. The mirror is no longer reflecting the light, and so the viewfinder goes dark.
There are some other differences between a DSLR camera and the other types of camera available, which are covered in more detail in my post on DSLR cameras.
 
DSLR Camera Controls: A GuideWhen you first take your new DSLR camera out of its box, you are going to notice that it has a lot of buttons and dials. And these can certainly be overwhelming. Which is likely why so many people I teach photography to confess that they just leave their camera in Auto and hope for the best.

For the most part, on a modern DSLR camera, Auto mode will actually do a pretty decent job in 80% of situations.

However, this also means that there are going to be times (let’s say 20%) that you aren’t going to get the shot you want if you leave everything up to the camera.
Because of this, learning how to use your camera to its fullest potential, and taking full control, should definitely be your end-goal.
Don’t worry if this takes you some time, or if you don’t understand everything at once. As I’ve already said in this post, photography is complicated and learning how a camera works is a process that takes time and practice.
A good start is reading a post like this, but do also consult your manual for your camera model. If your camera didn’t come with a manual, you can usually find relevant information by searching online for “your camera model manual”.
Here’s an overview of the key controls on your DSLR Camera. Note that different camera models will have slightly different controls, but the majority will have the following options.

Mode DialThe mode dial is the first dial you’ll want to locate. This is the dial that tells the camera how much control you want over its various settings. To change the mode, you just rotate the dial.
Most mode dials have a wide variety of options, which will include an “Auto” mode, for full automatic, and an “M” mode, for full manual.
They will also often include a variety of scenery modes, which are automatic modes where you give the camera a clue as to what sort of scene you are shooting, say a landscape or a portrait.
In between the Automatic and Manual modes there will also usually be a number of other modes which bridge the gap between fully automatic and fully manual, and it is these modes, particularly the last two, that I suggest you become familiar with and start to use. These are as follows.
  • “P” mode. This is the Program Automatic mode. It is basically just another automatic mode, albeit one where you have control over some settings, including exposure compensation, ISO and white balance. I would generally advise skipping over “P” and moving straight to one of the two modes below instead, “A” or “S”.
  • “A” or “Av” mode. This is the Aperture Priority mode. This mode and the mode below are the half way house between full automatic and full manual. Aperture priority mode means that you set the aperture (useful for controlling depth of field) and the camera will judge the light in the scene and set the shutter speed to get the correct exposure. You can also control ISO, exposure compensation and white balance. As a landscape photographer, this is my go-to mode for 90% of my photos.
  • “S”, “T” or “Tv” mode. This is known as Shutter Priority Mode. Shutter priority is similar to aperture priority mode, except you set the shutter speed, and then the camera sets the aperture based on the light in the scene. Shutter priority is good for when you want to control movement in a shot, such as for isolating the flight of a fast moving bird, or to show movement in a long exposure shot.


Some photographers will tell you that you have to shoot in manual to have full control over your photos. Personally I disagree with this. The main thing is to understand what the different modes are, and what effect the different settings in your camera have on your shot.
As long as you are comfortable with this, and you understand how changing aperture, shutter speed and ISO can affect your shot, that is the key.
If you are unclear on how these three elements, known together as the exposure triangle, work together in photography, we have a detailed guide to the exposure triangle to help you out.
I also suggest reading my guide to depth of field in photography, which explains this in more detail. You may also consider signing up to my online photography course, which covers the exposure triangle and much more in great detail.
Once you understand the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO, the choice of whether to shoot in manual, shutter priority, or aperture priority is up to you. It will likely come down to personal preference, and the scene you are shooting. There is no “right” option.
As a rule of thumb, I find aperture priority works well for most of my photography because it lets me control depth of field, which is a key compositional technique.
For portraits and landscape work, this is usually more important to me than controlling motion – except when I am doing landscapes where I want to capture movement.
For any scene involving movement, such as action photography, shutter priority often is the most useful mode. This lets me control whether I freeze the subject with a fast shutter speed, or show a bit of movement with a slower shutter speed.
When a scene has particularly challenging lighting, or depth of field and movement are both key considerations for the composition, then I will shoot in manual. This is often the case for scenarios like fireworks photography, photos of the Northern Lights or any long exposure photography.

Exposure Compensation (+/-)Nearly every camera out there, including smartphones, will have some form of exposure compensation feature. This lets you quickly make the image brighter or darker by either increasing or decreasing the exposure compensation.
The exposure compensation will either be a dedicated button or dial on the camera, or will be easily accessible through the camera’s menu system.
As an explanation for the name, when you take a photo, the process that camera goes through is actually known as an exposure. The sensor inside the camera is “exposed” to the light. This is a throwback to the days of film photography, when exposing the chemicals in the film to the light caused it to react.
Today, the sensor just records the information electronically, but the term exposure has stuck.
Whatever mode your camera is in, it will always judge the light in the scene. It uses this to calculate correct settings so as to get an image that is neither too bright nor too dark, known as a correctly exposed image.
If your camera is in automatic mode, all of this is done for you.
On a DSLR camera, in Program Auto, Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority modes, you can override these settings with exposure compensation.
As an example, if you have your camera in aperture priority and set an aperture of f/8, the camera will calculate the exposure in the scene and set the shutter speed to give what it thinks is a good exposure.
Sometimes however the camera will get it wrong, and the image will be too dark or too light. You can use exposure compensation to basically tell the camera to increase or decrease the amount of light. As you have fixed the aperture, the camera will adjust the shutter speed accordingly.
Exposure compensation is a quick and handy way to adjust the overall brightness of an image without having to go into full manual mode.
 
Control Wheel for Shutter and ApertureIf you are shooting in aperture priority or shutter priority, you will need a way to change the aperture or shutter speed.

Nearly every camera has a control wheel, which you rotate to increase or decrease these settings. If you are in aperture priority mode, the control wheel will increase and decrease the aperture setting.
If you are in shutter priority mode, the same wheel will increase and decrease the shutter speed.
If you are in manual, then you will need to be able to adjust both the shutter speed and the aperture. Different cameras handle this differently – some have two wheels, some offer a button that you depress to switch what you are changing.
Consult your camera manual to see how to change aperture and shutter speed in manual mode.
 
ISO ButtonISO is the third control you have over the exposure of an image. Increasing the ISO makes the camera’s sensor more sensitive to the light, and reducing it reduces the sensitivity to the light.
If you are in manual mode and set the aperture and the shutter speed and then change the ISO, you will notice the image getting brighter and darker.
However, increasing the ISO also makes the image more grainy, as the increased sensitivity of the sensor means that digital “noise” is added to the image.
As a result, ISO is usually the last thing we want to increase. Ideally, ISO will stay at a range between ISO 100 and ISO 400, a range in which most cameras produce nice clean images.
However, sometimes it is just too dark to produce acceptable images without increasing the ISO. For this reason, most cameras will have a dedicated ISO button, which provides a shortcut for quickly increasing and decreasing the ISO.
It is really important to remember to check the ISO before you take any image. If you set it to a high value manually, the camera will remember that value until you change it.
I have spoken with travelers who have ruined a whole trips worth of photos because they set their ISO to a high value for an evening, and then forgot to put it back down to a lower value for the daytime.
It’s really hard to see the resulting noise on the back of the camera screen – it’s only when you get home and look at your images that you will notice the graininess in all your images.
Key buttons on my Canon DSLR 
Focus ModeFocus is the process of ensuring the subject we are taking a picture of is sharp. An out of focus image will produce a blurry result that is not ideal.
To help with focus, DSLR cameras have a range of focus modes. Which you use will depend on what you are taking a photo of.
The first option that the camera is likely to be set is the standard autofocus mode. In this mode, the camera will default to focusing on what it thinks the subject is. You can take control of this by specify the region of the image you want the camera to focus by changing the image focal point.
This will either be with a dedicated button on the camera, or perhaps by using a touchscreen interface to touch the focus point.
If your subject is moving, then the camera has a different focus mode, which might be called continuous autofocus. It is called continuous because the camera will continue to adjust the focus as the subject moves, rather than just getting focus once.
Finally, the camera will also let you control the focus yourself manually. In this mode, you will have to adjust the focus ring, which is normally found on the cameras lens. It will be a ring all the way around the lens which you can rotate to change the focus.
 
Metering ModeI have mentioned throughout the post that your camera evaluates the light in the scene you are taking a picture of in order to calculate the correct exposure. This process, where the camera meters the light to come up with the correct exposure, is known as metering.
You can change the metering mode of your camera, depending on the scene you are taking a photo of, to help ensure your subject is correctly exposed.
The main control you have is over how much of the scene is used for the metering. The default mode, which will work for most photos, is known as evaluative metering on Canon cameras and matrix metering on Nikon cameras.
This mode looks at the light across nearly the whole frame of your image, to produce a balanced exposure. This will cover nearly all your photography requirements.
Sometimes however, we are shooting a scene with challenging lighting – like a dark building against a bright sky. In this case, the default metering mode might give you an image which is technically well balanced, but the building will likely be too dark to be usable.
To resolve this, you could use exposure compensation, or you could change the metering mode.
Different cameras have different metering modes you can choose. The most common is a spot metering mode or a partial metering mode, which means that camera will just use the centre part of the scene to do its exposure calculation.
This means that bright sections of the image around the edges away from the middle will not impact the final shot, and in our example, the building would end up correctly exposed.
 
Focus RingThe last two controls on your DSLR camera that we’re going to talk about are on the camera’s lens. The first one is the focus ring, which we briefly touched upon.
If your camera is in manual focus mode, the focus ring is what you will use to achieve focus. On some cameras, even if the camera is set to autofocus, you can override that with the manual focus ring as well.
 
Focal Length RingThe focal length ring is also on the camera’s lens, and is found on any lens that has a variable focal length. In basic terms, this is the camera’s zoom. Changing the focal length changes the zoom, and rotating the focal length ring is what you do to change the zoom.
More key buttons on my Canon DSLR 
How to Use Your DSLR CameraI’m now going to cover some tips and tricks for using your DSLR, and some areas you should focus on to improve your photography.
 
1. Learn How to Hold a DSLR Camera ProperlyThe first thing you are going to need to do is learn how to hold your new DSLR camera properly. It’s really important to try and minimise camera movement when taking photos, as this will translate directly into blurry images.
Most DSLR cameras are relatively heavy, and should always be held with two hands. This will stabilize the camera a great deal more than if you just try to operate it one handed.
If you are right handed, the correct way to hold the camera is with your right hand around the hand grip and one of your fingers over the shutter button. I prefer to use my index finger for the shutter button. Try to ensure the rest of your fingers are tightly gripping the camera’s grip, if they all fit.
Your other hand should be holding the cameras lens from underneath to support it.
Ideally, you will have your elbows tucked in tight to your body which will provide additional stability.
If you struggle with maintaining stability when holding a camera, consider investing in a travel tripod to provide the necessary stability that your camera needs for sharp photos.

 
2. Get the Horizon levelThis is a personal bugbear – I find photos where the horizon isn’t level to be quite off putting!
Sure, this is something that you can fix in editing software, but rotating an image can degrade the quality. So ideally you want to try and get the horizon level whilst you shoot.
Most cameras will have the option to overlay a grid on the screen, or markers inside the optical viewfinder that can help with this, but ultimately it just takes practice to get this right.

 
3. Understand the Exposure TriangleI’ve talked about the exposure triangle a number of times already in this post, and that’s because it’s one of the most important photography concepts to understand if you want to take control over your camera.
It can also a fairly challenging concept that takes time to understand, because it includes three different variables, all of which also change how the final image looks.
The Exposure Triangle is called the exposure triangle because it refers to the three things you can change, all three of which affect the exposure of the image.
The three things you can adjust to change the exposure of the image are the aperture, the shutter speed and the ISO.
The aperture is a hole inside the lens which lets light through. You can make this hole bigger or smaller, to let more or less light through.
The shutter is like a curtain inside the camera that whisks aside to let light onto the sensor. Changing the shutter speed changes the length of time the shutter is open – longer time lets more light through, less time lets less light through.
As you will see from the above two controls, they are both related to how much light is hitting the sensor.
The third control you have over exposure, and the third “side” of the exposure triangle, is the ISO setting. ISO controls how sensitive the sensor in your DSLR is to that incoming light.
If you increase the ISO, you increase the sensitivity, and vice versa.
You might wonder why you need three different settings to essentially control the same thing – the exposure.
Well, the answer is that these three settings also control how the final image will look. Aperture and shutter speed in particular are important compositional tools, whilst ISO contributes to how noisy the image is.
More specifically, aperture controls depth of field, and shutter speed controls how movement is portrayed in a shot. These will be covered in the below tips in a bit more detail so you can see when and why you might want to change any of them.

 
4. Master the Rules of CompositionI am of the belief that there are three main areas of photography that you need to master to get great photos.
The first of these is understanding your camera, which will let you be sure you can set your camera up properly to get great images. This post is primarily focusing on this area of photography.
The second thing you need to understand is composition, which is the art of placing your subjects within the image and using elements of the world to create a visually pleasing image.
Composition includes things like the rule of thirds, use of colour, leading lines and framing. As you would imagine though, such a major topic requires more than a few sentences to properly cover, and as such I’ve written a full guide to photography composition which you should check out.
Finally, the third thing I think everyone should master is photo editing, which is how you get the most from the photos you’ve captured with your DSLR. As a starter with that, I recommend checking out my guide to the best photo editing software which will give you some pointers as to what options are on the market for photo editing.

 
5. Learn about Depth of FieldAs I discussed in my section on the exposure triangle, aperture controls depth of field. So you might be wondering what this is.
Well, if you’ve ever seen a portrait shot, where the subject is clearly in focus, and everything else in the shot is nicely blurred away, then you have seen an example of a shallow depth of field.
Depth of field basically refers to how much of the image is in focus in front of and behind the subject, relative to the camera.
For landscapes, you usually want the majority of the image is focus, so you would want a deep depth of field. For portraits, you want the opposite, so you would want a shallow depth of field.
Changing the aperture changes the depth of field. For more on this, see my guide to depth of field in photography, which covers this subject in much more depth.

 
6. Consider MovementMovement can be a powerful compositional technique, and this is controlled by shutter speed, another part of the exposure triangle.
When you want to freeze motion in an image – say that of a hummingbird flapping it’s wings, or a fast moving vehicle, you will want to use a fast shutter speed. Fast in this context might be anything from 1/500th of a second and higher.
On the other hand, if you want to show motion in your images – perhaps the movement of water, or give the impression of movement by blurring a person who is moving, you would use a slower shutter speed. In this case, slow would generally be anything from 1/15th of a second and slower.
For more on using shutter speeds to control how your image looks, take a look at my guide to long exposure photography, which covers this subject in more detail.
Hopefully now you can see how aperture and shutter speed affect your final image differently, and see why it’s so important from a composition point of view to understand how to change these yourself rather than leaving it up to the camera!

 
7. Use the LightPhotography is all about light. The photos you capture are basically that – the light in the world, reflecting off surfaces, and being recorded by the sensor in your camera.
So as you would imagine, understanding how best to use light will help you with your photography no end.
First, you need to appreciate that the position and angle of the light relative to your shot will make a big difference. An overhead light will create flatter images, whilst a low light will create more visually pleasing images with depth.
This is why shooting at the start and end of the day is generally preferred. The light at these times of day is also a nice yellow tone, which we refer to as being warm. This also makes for more pleasing images.
As a general rule, it’s also best to shoot away from your light source rather than towards it. Shooting away from the light means your subjects will be correctly illuminated rather than in shadow.

 
8. Practice, practice, practiceI think I have already mentioned this in the post a few times, but just to reiterate, photography is a skill that takes time to master.
Until you start putting concepts like those I outline in this post into actual practice, they won’t really stick or make as much sense. I urge you to grab your camera and start playing with the different settings I’ve talked about in this post.
Get an idea of how changing different things changes the image. Learn how to read the shutter speed, aperture and ISO readouts that your camera overlays in the viewfinder. Play with exposure compensation.
It can be a good idea to set yourself challenges, and to get into the habit of taking your camera with you when you leave the house so you can get some practice in.
I definitely can’t emphasise this enough – practice makes perfect with every skill, and photography is no different.
 
How to Care for and Protect your New DSLRNow you have your DSLR Camera, you will want it to last for a good long while. And with these tips, it will.
How to Protect your DSLRA DSLR is a fairly robust piece of equipment, but it is still a piece of electronics with a number of glass components, and as such, it does need to be looked after.
The two accessories I suggest you buy for your DSLR are a lens hood, also known as a sun hood, and a clear UV filter.
These will both protect the lens on your DSLR. This is the bit that protrudes the most, and is the part of your camera that is most susceptible to damage from every day knocks and bumps.
UV filters are relatively inexpensive (around $15 – $40 a piece), as are sun hoods. You just have to get them at the right size for your lens – this should be clearly marked in the item description.
For filters, every filter has a mm rating, which will match the lenses filter thread diameter. For example, most of my lenses have a 77mm filter thread, so I use 77mm filters like this.
You can see a collection of UV filters here and lens hoods here.
 
How to Clean your DSLROver time, a DSLR will naturally pick up dirt and dust from the environment. I find the two things that come in useful for cleaning it are an air blower like this, and micro fibre cloths like this.
These are also available as an inexpensive cleaning kit which contains a number of items for cleaning your camera that you might find useful.
I don’t do any internal cleaning of my camera other than occasionally blowing air to remove dust specks from the sensor. See my section below on DSLR camera servicing for more thorough cleaning options.
 
Tips for Traveling with a DSLRIf you are going to be traveling with your DSLR then I highly recommend buying a well designed camera bag. Camera bags come with a lot of additional padding that you don’t get in ordinary bags, and they also usually have compartments for your different pieces of equipment, including lenses, spare memory cards, batteries and so on.
You can also get camera bags that are designed to to also carry other items, with part of the bag designed for camera equipment, and the other part for travel items like clothing.
I use and travel with Vanguard bags, who make a wide range of camera related products, including tripods, bags and other accessories. I’ve been a Vanguard ambassador for a number of years and their gear has always been reliable and well made.
They have a wide range of bag options, including this trolley bag, this backpack and this sling bag. I suggest picking a bag that fits your gear plus a bit more, so you have plenty of room.
If you choose to buy direct from the Vanguard store, I have an exclusive discount code you can use to get 20% off everything in their US store. Just enter the coupon code FindingTheUniverse (FindingTheUniverseUK in the Vanguard UK store) at checkout to get the discount!
You should always try and keep your camera equipment with you when travelling rather than checking it into hold luggage so you can keep an eye on it and ensure it is handled properly.
 
Should you Service Your DSLR?The short answer is yes. From time to time, I would suggest getting your DSLR camera and lenses properly serviced by a qualified technician.
I aim to get my cameras serviced around once a year, and usually I find a Canon certified dealer to do it for me. I’ve also been lucky to attend some Canon sponsored events like the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, where free servicing was offered.
A service will usually involve a thorough clean of the sensor and a careful inspection of any other elements of the hardware. I can definitely recommend trying to get this done on a fairly regular basis to keep your camera in good working order.
 
Best DSLR Camera for BeginnersIf you came to this post and you don’t already have a camera, you might be wondering what the best DSLR camera is for you to start with.
We actually have a detailed guide to the best DSLR cameras for travel photography, which covers a range of brands and budgets.
However, for starting out, we suggest you consider the following two entry-level DSLR models. These have all the features you need to learn photography, but won’t break the bank.

1. Canon EOS Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D)In the world of DSLRs, there are two main manufacturers – Canon and Nikon. For an entry level camera, we would recommend getting one from either of these manufacturers.
Canon’s entry level camera line carries the “Rebel” name in North America (EOS xxxD in Europe), and my first DSLR was a Canon Rebel XTi.

The EOS Rebel T7 shows just how much has changed since those days, with what would have then been flagship technologies now available even in the low end model. You get a 24MP sensor, WiFI and a 500 shot battery capacity. ~450 USD (with lens)
 
 
2. Nikon D3500The entry level Nikon DSLR camera is the D3500. It offers great performance in a slightly smaller package than the Canon, and also has excellent battery life, rated for 1550 shots per charge.

You also get 24.2 APS-C sized sensor, good performance and an excellent selection of lenses. This is a great first camera that will last you for a good number of years.
When it comes to picking between these two cameras, some of it will come down to how they feel in your hand. The interfaces are slightly different too, but when you are starting out this doesn’t make a big difference.
In terms of what you get for your money, if you are manufacturer agnostic, the Nikon offers slightly better specifications for the same money. ~450 USD (with lens)
 
If you want to spend a bit more, or are looking for additional features like moving touchscreens, then take a look at our DSLR camera post for many more options.
 
Further ReadingIf you have recently picked up a DSLR camera, or are thinking of buying a new DSLR camera, then you are likely near the beginning of your photography journey. Well, I’m here to help on that journey – I’ve written a number of photography guides which I think you will find useful to help improve your photography.

These cover a wide range of topics, from beginner content through to intermediate and more advanced concepts. Here’s a selection to get you started.
  • If you’re interested in learning more about how a DSLR works, see our DSLR camera guide.
  • Knowing how to compose a great photo is a key photography skill. See our guide to composition in photography for lots of tips on this subject
  • Once you’ve mastered aperture, you can control depth of field. Read more about what depth of field is and when you would want to use it.
  • If you have a lens with a zoom feature, you can take advantage of something called lens compression to make objects seem closer together than they are.
  • We are big fans of getting the most out of your digital photo files, and do to that you will need to shoot in RAW. See our guide to RAW in photography to understand what RAW is, and why you should switch to RAW as soon as you can.
  • You’re going to need some way of editing your photos. See our guide to the best photo editing software, as well our our guide to the best laptops for photo editing. We also have a guide to getting the best performance out of Adobe Lightroom, our preferred editing software.
  • If you’re looking for advice on specific tips for different scenarios, we also have you covered. See our guide to Northern Lights photography, long exposure photography, fireworks photography,
  • tips for taking photos of stars, and cold weather photography.
  • You may hear photographers talking about a concept called back button focus. If you’ve ever wondered what that is, and want to know how to start using it, see our guide to back button focus.
  • For landscape photography, you might find you need filters to achieve the look you want. See our guide to ND filters for more on that.
  • If you’re looking for a great gift for a photography loving friend or family member (or yourself!), take a look at our photography gift guide,
  • If you’re in the market for a new camera, we have a detailed guide to the best travel cameras, as well as specific guides for the best cameras for hiking and backpacking, the best compact camera, best mirrorless camera and best DSLR camera. We also have a guide to the best camera lenses.
  • We have a guide to why you need a tripod, and a guide to choosing a travel tripod
  • Finally, if you want to improve your photography overall and get one-on-one feedback from me as you do, you can join over 1,000 students on my travel photography course. I’ve been running this since 2016, and  it has helped lots of people take their photography to the next level.


And that’s it for our detailed guide to getting the most out of your new DSLR. As always, we’re happy to take feedback and answer your questions – just pop them in the comments below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.
Read more: https://www.findingtheuniverse.com/dslr-camera-beginners-guide/


Watch my Video on https://www.youtube.com/user/PhotoClub7910
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 22.21.08 | Message # 8
Forum: Camera News | Thread: Panasonic Lumix S1 review: A formidable full-framer
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Mike Lowe | 6 May 2019
After months of teasing us with glimpses of its forthcoming full-frame mirrorless range, Panasonic has now fully lifted the lid on its S1 and S1R cameras.
It's a massive deal for the brand - which has been pushing its Micro Four Thirds system cameras, Lumix G, for over a decade - as the S series marks an entry into an entirely new and more pro-focused market.
So how does the Lumix S1 actually perform and can it hold off its mirrorless full-frame rivals - such as the Sony A7R IIICanon EOS R, and Nikon Z6 - despite being later to the game? We've been using the latest Lumix to find out.
Lens mount
  • Uses Leica L mount: Leica SL, TL, CL; Lumix S Pro; forthcoming Sigma lenses
  • Not compatible with Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lenses


First up, the all important lens mount. Which is actually the Leica L mount. Yep, you read that correctly: Panasonic, along with Sigma, has forged a lens alliance with the German brand, so all three will produce lenses for this fitting.
Which is kind of exciting, as you could buy some great Leica glass for this Panasonic. At the same time, however, the design of this mount makes for a large lens design. If you've ever seen a Leica SL then you'll know what we mean.

So the Lumix S1 is a big camera with big lenses - which might sound like a problem, but for most pros in the know they'll be content knowing it's easy to grab with one or two hands, comfortably, and use for long periods of time. At first we thought it was all too big and chunky, but over time we've become used to using it.
As for Micro Four Thirds? Panasonic will continue to push this format, but it's entirely unrelated to the S. It won't ever be possible to use MFT lenses with the S series due to the physical mount's design and the inevitable difference in lens coverage.
Design and features
  • 5.76m-dot OLED viewfinder, 0.78x magnification, 120fps refresh
  • 3.2-inch, 2.1m-dot LCD touchscreen, tri-adjustment bracket
  • Top display panel with illuminator
  • 1-2 switch (for two-form setup)
  • Joystick toggle control
  • 100% weather sealed
  • SD & XQD card slots


So we've established that it's a big ol' beast, but that's not to say the S1 isn't well designed. It's easy to use and, in many senses, feels like an upsized Lumix G9. Only it's better in every way - not least because the S1's shutter feels 'proper' without the click-happy over-response of the G9.

For starters the joystick on the rear of the S1 makes it very easy to centralise the focus point or move it around (although it's hyper-sensitive in menu settings, which is annoying). Up top there's a light-up panel with all the settings in clear view as and when needed, ahead of which are dedicated exposure comp, ISO and white balance buttons - it's even easy enough to make adjustments to these settings without removing your eye from the viewfinder, if that's how you're shooting.
Like with the G9 there's also a '1-2 Switch' to the front, where it's possible to pre-assign settings in either mode, then quickly toggle between them with the flick of that switch. Those with established workflows will find this useful, especially in rapid pace environments where quickly changing up, say, the shutter speed along with the ISO sensitivity and other image quality settings all in one becomes an essential time-saver.

The Lumix S1 also has the highest resolution viewfinder that we've ever seen in a camera too. Its a large scale, with a comfortable and rounded eyecup, delivering a whopping 5.76 million dots of resolution. In a sense it's like strapping a Full HD telly to your eyeballs. There are three levels to the magnification if the 0.78x mag proves too large for you (we wear glasses, so the step-down option was useful for the most representative view for us) using the dedicated button just around from the eyecup. As electronic viewfinders go there's no better.
The 3.2-inch LCD screen takes a leaf out of Fujifilm's book and adopts a tri-adjustment bracket so that it can be moved for waist-level or overhead work in both portrait and landscape orientations. However, the finder's eyecup gets in the way of a clear view, which is a shame, while we don't find the lever-like release to get the portrait orientation especially practical. There's also no way to protect the screen without housing the camera in a proper bag - so we worried we'd scratch the screen compared with other vari-angle screen cameras we've used where the screen can be reversed back on itself.

To the side the twin card slot is hidden behind another lever-like release. This needs to be dragged down while pulling the card cover to access the two slots available: one for SD (up to UHS-II), the other for XQD. We don't really know why Panasonic has pushed for the latter, maybe it's to try and tempt over those Nikon users, eh? We'd rather just have two SD slots, or the option to pick which cards the camera uses at purchase instead.
Performance
  • Autofocus capable to -6EV, sensor output at 480fps for 0.08s focus acquisition
  • Eye AF, Animal AF, for automatic tracking of subjects


Big body, big lenses, big performance too, right? Panasonic makes some considerable claims about the S1, including its autofocus system's capability down to -6EV.

We've found the AF setup to be lightning quick in good light and largely successful in low-light - although certain scenes in a very dark bar did cause the system to hunt for focus, while the built-in illuminator lamp didn't always highlight a subject as successfully as we'd like due to the lenses' scale. As a result some dark scenes are sometimes going to pose an issue - something the f/1.4 50mm lens might help with! - and having used the S1 for a longer period of time we've found this to ring true for low-light situations.
Panasonic has long delivered a variety of modes for its focus system in its MFT cameras, with the S1 picking up all those from the Lumix G9: there's automatic full-area focus, adjustable area focus over a variety of points, 1-area focus, 1-area+ focus (a larger second area keeps an eye out for moving subjects), along with Pinpoint AF (for single autofocus only, which zooms into 100 per cent for precision focus). All of these work well whether you're using the toggle control or prefer to tap, pinch-to-expand or drag a finger around the screen. It's very easy and very versatile.
The big new mode is Eye AF, set to rival Sony's similar feature - something the A6400 offers, with the A9 set to follow. Switch this on and it automatically recognises a subject, drawing a white box around them. For faces it'll lock in to the eyes for precision focus without you needing to do much more than direct your subject. We shot some models on a test shoot and the mode worked flawlessly - quickly acquiring focus and producing sublime sharp results. There's even an Animal Detection on/off option within this mode, should you be shooting non-human subjects.

Overall, then, the Lumix S1 responds fast, acquires focus fast, has a wide breadth of autofocus modes, and copes pretty well in low-light too. Will it be enough to draw those away from Sony and DSLR systems with established continuous tracking modes? Eye AF alone might be enough, as it's mighty impressive, although the odd slip-up in low-light is a minor shortcoming.

Image Quality
  • Sensor-based image stabilisation: 6-stop 'Dual Stabilisation' (for both stills and videos)
  • All-new 24.3-megapixel full-frame sensor and Venus Engine
  • Standard ISO sensitivity up to 51,200
  • High Resolution Photo (96MP)


We've shot all kinds of scenes with the S1 - from flash-sync (up to an impressive 1/320th sec), to natural sunlight and interior lamps of varying colour temperatures - and it's coped well with the variety. A little underexposure isn't uncommon, though, but exposure compensation is easy to adjust on the fly as needed thanks to the dedicated switch.
So what of the quality from this brand new 24-million-pixel sensor? When we first saw the camera in its pre-production state we were already impressed, so having used the final production sample for a week we're glad those initial impressions are met and exceeded upon.
Sharpness is fantastic, especially with Eye AF in use, showing off what this lens mount is capable of achieving - even with 'just' the 24-105mm f/4 lens - and that could be bettered in the future with yet more impressive optics to come later down the line.
However, it's hard not to look over at Nikon, with its Z6, to see just how eye-poppingly good the results from that new lens mount are. And with such an established base of users there already, we suspect Panasonic and its opting for a Leica mount won't necessarily lure in the punters - irrelevant of potential.

Read More: https://www.pocket-lint.com/cameras....rorless


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 21.57.38 | Message # 9
Forum: For Sale | Thread: 298 LED MTL-900 Pro II Video Light Remote Control 3200K-5600
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Order at: https://wowprice.ie/298-led....k-5600k
Price: 150.00€
298PCS LED beads with high CRI(RA>88), low heat and long service life. Portable and compact degisn, its diameter is only 4.5cm, either handheld or mounted on tripod(1/4"mounting hole) is available. It support IR remote control to adjust the bright freely,instead of moving back and forth. Smart memory IC, automatically backup the brightness at last time. Professional LED Driver IC provides stable performance and high efficiency exceeding 93%. Light touch button, long service life up to 100,000 times. Use detachable battery, universal NP-F550, much flexible and convenient. Built-in li-ion battery charging circuit, no need to remove the battery while charging. Easy color temperature switching with 3200k filter tube. Support Internation SOS emergency signal transmission via flashing. Attached desktop charger for extra battery, make sure continuous working needs
Some tips for better  use and safety:
 1. Do not stare at the bulb when video light is on
 2. Do not cover the ventilation hole while using, which may casue thermal damage
 3. When in low battery status, its brightness is below the normal. Please turn off and charge it soon
 4. Long press the power button to turn it off after use
 5. Make sure it has cooled down before plugging into the bag
Specification:
 1. LED beads: 298PCS
 2. Voltage: 6V~9V
 3. Power: 0.8W~20W
 4. Lumination: 1600LM
 5. Illumination distance: 3~10M
 6. Size: 45(D)x561(H)MM
 7. Charging time: 2.5hrs
 8. Battery model: NP-F550
 9. Material: Space aluminum alloy
10.RA: 88

Package contents:
1x MTL-900pro Handheld Magical Wand Light
1x NP-F550 Battery
1x Remote Control
1x Power Adapter
1x User Manual
1x Carry Bag

















Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 11.09.53 | Message # 10
Forum: Events | Thread: Photokina Cologne 27. - 30. May 2020
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
The photokina is the leading international trade fair of the entire photographic and imaging industry. It offers as the only event worldwide the comprehensive presentation of all visual media, all imaging techniques and all imaging markets - for professionals and for consumers. The spectrum ranges from image acquisition, storage and processing to image transfer and playback. The photokina is understood not only as a revenue driver of the photo and imaging industry, but also as a novelty and trend forum, which significantly shows the convergence and integration of different technologies and product lines. The photokina is divided into five theme worlds: Capture your world - cameras, lenses and equipment, Light up your world - light, flashes and tripods, Share your world - store, connect and transfer, Create your world - input, treatment and processing, Show your world - finishing, printing and presentation. That is why photokina is much more than just photography. It offers worlds for touching, experiencing and immersing and helps to make the fascination imaging tangible. With live photo shoots, video and photography workshops and the photokina action zone it is taken care of a lot of variety and fun. For young photographers and students the photokina academy offers a meeting place to network and interact with professionals and other students of the scene. The highlight of photokina is the prize for the winner of the Cologne Photo Marathon, which takes place prior to the fair.
On the whole the organisers welcomed on the 6 days of the fair, from 20. September to 25. September 2016, about 983 exhibitors from 42 countries and 191000 visitors on the photokina in Cologne.
This year the photokina takes place on 4 days from Wed., 27.05.2020 to Sat., 30.05.2020 in Cologne already for the thirty-sixth time.


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 10.57.50 | Message # 11
Forum: Events | Thread: The Photography Show 2020
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
The Photography Show and The Video Show will return to the NEC, between 14-17 March 2020, offering everything any photographer or moving image maker, enthusiast or pro could possibly dream of; from the latest kit by leading brands to inspiring talks and demos from some of the best names in the industry. Not only that, it's fun, and it's accessible to all (families welcome). Whatever your level or interest, come and see what it's all about.
Read More: https://www.photographyshow.com/about/about-the-show

Added (09.08.2019, 11.01.15)
---------------------------------------------

Added (09.08.2019, 11.01.55)
---------------------------------------------

Added (09.08.2019, 11.03.03)
---------------------------------------------


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 10.51.30 | Message # 12
Forum: For Sale | Thread: Canon Eos Strap Blue Red White
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline

Order at:https://wowprice.ie/Canon-Eos-Strap
Price: 7.00€
Canon  Eos Strap Blue Red White good condition see picture


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 10.33.39 | Message # 13
Forum: For Sale | Thread: AUTO-PROMURA ZOOM Lens 80-200mm 1:4.5 PENTAX PK
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Order at:https://wowprice.ie/vintage-used/used-lenses-cork/AUTO-PROMURA-80-200mm-1-4-5-PENTAX-PK
Price: 30.00€
Nice lens still in good working condition.


Attachments: 0561195.jpg(15.3 Kb) · 8862778.jpg(13.9 Kb) · 9766202.jpg(15.0 Kb)


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie

Message edited by info - Friday, 09.08.2019, 10.34.18
 
infoDate: Friday, 09.08.2019, 10.11.05 | Message # 14
Forum: For Sale | Thread: 1993 CANON SURE SHOT Z115 35mm Film Camera
Private
Group: Checked
Messages: 7
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Order at: https://wowprice.ie/1993-CANON-SURE-SHOT-Z115
Price: 20.00€
Nice Camera tested in working condition test is made without film.  

Lens: 38-105mm zoom, f/3.6-8.5. (10 elements in 9 groups, including an aspherical element for excellent sharpness.)
Focus: Three-point AI active auto-focus from 0.6m to infinity. (0.4m close range in macro mode).
Viewfinder: Direct zoom viewfinder. 0.47x-1.22x magnification and 84% coverage, with focal length markings, LED ready and low-light warning.
Auto-loading, advancing and rewinding of DX-coded 35mm (25-3200 ISO). Continuous shooting at 1 fps.
Auto-exposure with 3-zone metering.
LCD with frame counter and mode icons.
Shutter-speed from 2-1/1200s depending on mode and focal length.
Auto-flash, with red-eye, Guide No. 14 (at ISO 100 in meters).
Real-time (RT) mode with shutter lag of just 0.03 seconds.
Self-timer.
Tripod socket.
Power: 2 x CR123A lithium batteries.
Dimensions: 130x70x60mm
Weight: 350g


Online Shop https://wowprice.ie
 
adminDate: Thursday, 08.08.2019, 22.18.11 | Message # 15
Forum: For Sale | Thread: Softbox Kit 1.8 x 2.8m Chose Color Background Stand 2x3m 250
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline


This professional portable 250W (total) soft box umbrella lighting backdrop support kit is a must for photographers and it suits all levels.
 
Energy Saving Light Bulbs - 125W/5500K energy saving compact fluorescent spiral bulb saves energy up to 80% while equals to 5 times regular incandescent light bulb output. 5500K color temperature is most suitable for studio shooting; unlike 6400K bulbs may lead to color aberration.
50x70cm Rectangular Soft Box - Ultimate soften light stream and remove shadow to make perfect shooting. Silver internal face can minimize light loss and maximize light spread. White soft cover strengthens the effect of soft light.
Lighting Stand - Solid safety 3 legs stages with locked system can hold light bulbs and umbrella and soft-box securely. Sturdy fitting helps setting up with minimal fuss. 72-224cm adjustable height allows you fold and unfold easily.
Backdrop Stand with Carry Bag - Heavy-duty aluminum construction and can be adjusted to any height from 72cm to 210cm.Two-section separate telescopic crossbars can adjust width from 84cm to 300cm easily.
1.8 x 2.8m Muslin Backdrops - Three 100% cotton seamless muslin backdrop (Black / White / Green) can be steam ironed. Seamless and weaving surface helps to absorb the light and eliminate reflection. 3" rod pocket at one end allows for easy set up.
Application - It is the perfect solution for product shooting and portrait as well as filming for online retailers and commercial product catalogue. This kit is suit for shooting bags, shoes, clothing, models, full length, waist-up portraits, close-ups, etc.
 
Package Includes:
2 x Light Bulbs (125W/5500K)2 x Soft Boxes (50x70cm)2 x Light Stands1 x Background Stand3 x Backdrops1 x Stand Carry Bag1 x Softbox Carry Bag  

 
adminDate: Monday, 29.07.2019, 19.46.23 | Message # 16
Forum: For Sale | Thread: Used: Canon Eos 77d Camera - Body Only
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Order at: https://wowprice.ie/Canon-Eos-77d-Camera-Body-Only
Let your creativity take control with the EOS 77D camera. Featuring an optical viewfinder with a 45-point all cross-type AF system and fast, accurate Dual Pixel CMOS AF with phase-detection, it helps you capture the action right as it happens. Alongside the viewfinder, the EOS 77D?s extensive, customizable controls and brilliant image quality help you get the photo looking exactly how you want it. Capture the vibrant colors and fine details of inspirational scenes with the 24.2 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) Sensor. Without missing a beat, check and change your settings with the top-mounted LCD screen and rear Quick Control dial. When you?re satisfied with your work, built-in Wi-Fi?, NFC and Bluetooth? technology lets you easily share your favorite photos and videos. Creative control and innovative customization comes with the EOS 77D.

Features24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
DIGIC 7 Image Processor
3.0" 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 60 fps
45-Point All Cross-Type Phase-Detect AF
Dual Pixel CMOS AF
Up to 6 fps Shooting and ISO 51200
Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
Top LCD and Rear Quick Control Dial
EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens"
In Box
1. Camera
1. Charger
1. Battery
1. Manual
1. Strap
 
adminDate: Friday, 19.07.2019, 20.26.11 | Message # 17
Forum: For Sale | Thread: 1986 Olympus Trip MD 35mm Film Camera
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
You can buy camera at: https://wowprice.ie/1986-Olympus-Trip-MD
Camera tested with battery but no film worked, for condition check picture.
The Trip AF MD of 1986 is a fully-automatic 35mm compact camera, with motor drive and auto-focus manufactured by Olympus. It was one of a series of cheap models branded with the famous Trip name.

Lens: Zuiko 35mm, f/3.8
Shutter speed: Fixed at 1/125s.
Integral Flash, with on/off switch.
Sliding lens cover prevents accidental shutter release.
Auto-wind and motor rewind of 35mm film.
Attachments: 2721474.jpg(18.4 Kb) · 8140551.jpg(18.0 Kb) · 9433758.jpg(18.8 Kb)
 
adminDate: Thursday, 12.07.2018, 06.28.05 | Message # 18
Forum: Just for fun | Thread: Zenit EM with Pentacon 50mm f1.8
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline

Nice vintage Camera
Attachments: 0791621.jpg(164.9 Kb) · 2135858.jpg(171.7 Kb) · 5126604.jpg(148.1 Kb) · 6896936.jpg(150.2 Kb)
 
adminDate: Wednesday, 11.07.2018, 06.52.36 | Message # 19
Forum: Digital Cameras | Thread: Best Digital Camera
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Hi users of Digital cameras looking for you opinion what is the best camera for you?
 
adminDate: Wednesday, 11.07.2018, 06.50.08 | Message # 20
Forum: Film Cameras | Thread: Best Film Camera
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Hi users of film cameras looking for you opinion what is the best camera for you?
 
adminDate: Wednesday, 11.07.2018, 06.46.36 | Message # 21
Forum: For Sale | Thread: Zenit EM Lens Pentacon 50mm f1.8
Private
Group: Administrators
Messages: 13
Reputation: 0
Status: Offline
Price is 55.00€
Zenit-EM is a 35mm film SLR made by KMZ and produced between 1965-86 
This camera is in excellent working condition with working selenium light meter. Fitted with Pentacon 50mm f1.8 lens. Camera has been cleaned and mechanically tested and is in good working order.
We can Ship camera around the world.
 
  • Page 1 of 1
  • 1
Search: