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Forum » EQUIPMENT » Digital Cameras » Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom (All about C-4040 if you have more information about comment.)
Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.45.48 | Message # 1
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The Olympus Camedia C-4040Zoom is one of several new 4 megapixel cameras entering the market, and therefore faces some strong competition. This model is in the top of the consumer range, retailing for around 800 and has some unique features. Some of its main features are listed below:
Main features

  • 3x multivariator zoom lens 7.1-21.3 mm, f/1.8-f/2.6, 10 lenses in 7 groups (equivalent to 35-105mm lens in 35mm camera).
  • 1/1.8 inch CCD solid-state image pickup 4.13million pixels (effective 3.98 million pixels).
  • 1.8 inch colour TFT LCD monitor with 114,000 pixels made of low-temperature poly-silicon. Brightness adjustment is possible.
  • Uses smartmedia cards.
  • 320g without batteries or Smart Media card.

What you get in the box:
  • C-4040Zoom camera
  • Strap
  • USB cable
  • Lens cap
  • Lithium battery CR-V3(2x)
  • RM-1 Remote control
  • AV cable (PAL)
  • Software CD-ROM

Handling
Handling is subjective, with things like hand-size and requirements influencing people's opinions. We all liked the Olympus, it feels solid and ergonomically friendly and we got positive feedback from friends who tried the camera too. The best thing about the feel is the large hand grip and overall light weight.
Compared to the Canon G2 we tested at the same time, the 
C-4040Z feels more comfortable. The grip on the G2 is smaller (shown in the animation to the right) and the camera feels unbalanced because of this. The Olympus grip feels very ergonomically friendly, but we'd always recommend you trying several cameras out for handling, as it's an often overlooked quality.
The camera comes with a remote control, which many manufacturers only offer as an optional extra. Great move Olympus, as it's really useful to use the remote instead of the timer mode for family shots where the photographer also wants to be in the frame. It's also good to use to prevent camera shake when the camera is mounted on a tripod.
As well as a shutter release the remote also has a zoom lens controller. Indoors the remote works fine up to eight meters with the camera facing you. This is reduced to about four meters outdoors. But when we tried to use the system to take pictures of some birds bathing in a stream about four meters away with the camera pointing away from the remote it wouldn't work. This is because the receiver is on the front of the camera and indoors can rely on light from the contoller bouncing of nearby walls to trigger, but outdoors it's useless. Manufacturers should consider placing the receiver somewhere where the remote can be used from any angle.
Menus
Digital cameras are often not the most user friendly devices, caused mainly by the wealth of features they can have and the difficulty in presenting all these to the user in a simple fashion. Manufacturers all have different systems of user interface, and they are applied with varying degrees of success. Having used many different digital cameras, I can say without a doubt the Olympus system is one of my favourites. They have added very useful features, such as customisable shortcuts which allow you to reconfigure the initial menu screen shown to the right (excludes mode menu):
The mode menu is divided into the following sections:
MenuFunction settings
Camera
Drive mode, ISO, A/S/M, Flash intensity, Slow flash, Noise reduction, Multi-metering, Digital Zoom, Fulltime AF, AF Mode, Sound, Panorama, Picture colour.
Picture
Record mode (Quality settings), White balance, Make colour bluer/redder, Sharpness, Contrast.CardFormat card.
Setup
All reset, Beep low/high/off, Record view on/off, File name reset/auto, Pixel mapping on/off, Monitor brightness, Date/time, Measurement units m/ft, Short cut, Custom button.Camera modes


On the top of the camera is the mode dial, this is easily switched while holding the camera with your right hand. It allows you to select from:
Program shooting: In this mode the camera automatically sets aperture and shutter speed.
A/S/M mode: Selecting this lets you select aperture, shutter speed or both at once.
Movie Record: Allows you to record movies in QuickTime format.
Play mode: For reviewing the shots you have taken.
The LCD display on the top of the camera is useful when you choose not to use the colour LCD screen. It shows information on the flash mode, focusing mode, flash intensity, battery level, white balance, ISO, Exposure compensation, Auto-bracket, macro mode, spot metering mode, shooting mode, record mode and number of pictures remaining.
Viewfinder and LCD screen
The viewfinder is a standard one with diopter adjustment, which I didn't find worked as well on some other cameras. The dipotre control wheel is tight and fiddly to set and the size of the viewfinder is small, making it uncomfortable to use.

The LCD screen, however, is bright and detailed allowing you to easily check the focus of shots. Unfortunately though it sticks out further than any other area on the back of the camera, so when placed down on a surface it can easily become scratched. You can adjust the brightness of the screen using the menu and turn it on or off using a button on the back of the camera.
Although the LCD screen is fixed, it has a very wide viewing angle. This means if you hold the camera say at 20cm up or down from eye level you can still see the display clearly. On some other cameras like the Nikon 885 you must hold the camera directly at eye level to see it clearly.
ConnectionsUnderneath a cover there is a DC-IN jack, A/V OUT jack (mono) and USB connector. On the side of the camera there is a covered 5-pin flash socket which has a screw on cover (taken off for this picture). No DC adaptor is provided with the camera, so this will have to be added to the cost if you want one.
Also shown in this picture is the diopter adjustment dial for the viewfinder and the protruding LCD screen.
Battery and SmartMedia compartments are to the right of the camera in the hand grip, aiding its weight distribution. Both holders are solidly built and easy to operate.Battery-life performance
The batteries provided are Lithiums, so are not rechargeable and no other batteries are provided. This means you have to budget the price of a rechargeable set of 4 AA batteries and a charger. We'd recommend you get some high capacity Ni-Mh batteries as these will give good performance. The supplied ones are best left as a backup so that if your rechargeables run out you don't miss that critical shot.

When using Ni-Mh batteries we obtained good performance. With one set of batteries lasting through a trip away of three days. This trip involved flash shots, many standard shots, and much reviewing of images on the LCD screen.
Image quality
There are a large amount of image quality settings, 17 in total. The image types are Tiff and JPG (SHQ, HQ). The resolutions available are 640x480, 1024x768, 1280x960, 1600x1200, 2048x1536, 2272x1704 and using interpolation 2816x2112 and 3200x2400.
We wanted to test if there were any advantages to using the camera's own interpolated mode. To do this we set up a test scene, and took two pictures, one in the true 2272x1704 size, and one in the interpolated 3200x2400 size. We then increased the size of the true file in Photoshop using bicubic interpolation, to compare the results side by side. Only a specific area of the original is shown in the below two pictures, this area is shown in the red square to the right.There is little difference between the two pictures, the 2272x1704 picture shows a minute amount more detail. For everyday purposes most people will want to use the true resolution of the CCD and save space on their memory card, the interpolated shot was 4.32Mb compared to 2.11Mb.
2272x1704 (increased using Photoshop bicubic interpolation to 3200x2400)C-4040Zoom internally interpolated 3200x2400Other people may want to use the benefits of the increased resolution for larger print sizes, and not want the inconvenience of editing their pictures before printing them.
One major issue we have with this camera, and it reflects heavily on the image quality is its lens. At first we were pleased to see f/1.8 on the specification, then on closer inspection of the resulting image quality we were less pleased. What we found particularly disappointing was the amount of lens movement when it was touched lightly, as most people do accidentally sometimes.Even cheaper cameras from other manufacturers do not have this much movement, and it's something we hope Olympus will rectify on future models.
Sample pictures

Shown on the right is an enlarged area of the picture above (highlighted by the red square).The purple areas are chromatic aberrations, and are quite distracting. However they are not visible on all shots taken with the camera, and could, with some effort, be edited out digitally.In other areas of the picture, colours are under saturated and dull. Detail is not as good as we'd hope for a camera costing this much, combined with a 4Mp CCD.

This house shot was taken at around 6pm, and the image highlighted in red to the bottom right shows approximately how dark it was. Using a one second exposure the camera has done a good job of capturing the scene, and the noise reduction has kept noise levels down well.

Setting the camera to its smallest aperture for this shot, we were disappointed by the softness of the trees and the bland colours. Looking at the results from other cameras for this shot we could clearly see the C-4040z is let down by its colour reproduction. One redeeming feature is that the camera's multi-metering worked well.

Using the manual mode for this shot we were able to set a shutter speed of 1/10sec resulting in a blurred effect with the water. The problem with colour reproduction remains and overall the photograph appears a little dull and soft.
Slightly over exposed the shot of this sculpture shows some more redeeming features of the 
C-4040z's image quality. Namely although not as sharp as some of the competition noise levels are low, and the camera achieved focus quite accurately and quickly, as it did in the majority of cases.

Verdict 
We found a lot to like about this camera, it handles very well and is easy to use. However the negative points concerning image quality cannot be overlooked. Unless you really want a 4Mp camera with a f/1.8 lens we'd recommend checking out the other contenders first. Namely the Sony DSC-S85 if you want to use memory sticks, and the Olympus C40z, Canon PowerShot S40 and Pentax Optio 430 if you would like something more compact. There is also the Canon PowerShot G2 if you'd like LCD swivel ability. If resolution is very important to you and price is not such a big concern, there are some 5 megapixel models out now as well.

Original article: https://www.ephotozine.com/article....ew-4288
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.47.07 | Message # 2
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We've begun including links in our reviews to a Thumber-generated index page for our test shots. The Thumber data includes a host of information on the images, including shutter speed, ISO setting, compression setting, etc. Rather than clutter the page below with *all* that detail, we're posting the Thumber index so only those interested in the information need wade through it!Outdoor Portrait (1771 k)Very sharp, good color (good skin, true blues), very little shadow noise. A great job all around!The extreme tonal range of this image makes it a tough shot for many digicams, which is precisely why we set it up this way. The object is to hold highlight and shadow detail without producing a "flat" picture with muddy colors, and the C-4040 performed well. The shot at right has a +0.7 EV exposure compensation adjustment, which brightened the midtones about as much as we felt we could without losing too many highlights. We shot this with the Auto (2085 k) white balance setting, as it resulted in more natural color than the Daylight (1809 k) white balance. (Daylight produced a much warmer image.) Color is very good, although skin tones are slightly magenta. The blue flowers look much better than what we see from most cameras, although there's still a hint of purple in them. (these blues are tough for digicams to get right). Excellent detail in the shadows, with low noise.Readers interested in seeing the effects of a range of exposure compensation settings are directed to the thumbnail page, and photos C44OUTAP0-4. These range from +0 to +1.3EV, in steps of 1/3 EV.
 Closer Portrait (2087 k)Excellent detail, good color. Some lost highlights though...Results are similar to the longer portrait shot above, with good color and resolution. The 3x zoom lens helps prevent distortion of the model's features, and more detail is visible than in the shot above. Skin tones again show a slight orange tint, but overall color looks nice. Shadow detail is great, with moderately low noise. Our main shot has no exposure adjustment at all, which still overexposes the highlight areas of the white shirt collar. (Olympus cameras have tended to have higher than average contrast in the past, the C4040 Zoom seems less so, but still struggles with the tonal range on this shot a bit.) The table below shows the results of a range of exposure settings from zero to +1.0 EV.Readers interested in seeing the effects of a range of exposure compensation settings on this shot are directed to the thumbnail page, and photos C44FACAP0-3. These range from +0 to +1.0EV, in steps of 1/3 EV.
 Indoor Portrait, Flash (2666 k)Flash is too dim in this shot without an EV boost, but does a good job when you tweak the power up a little.The C-4040's flash was slightly dim without any exposure compensation, but did a good job illuminating the subject when we cranked it up a bit. (We really like variable flash power as a digicam feature, it comes in very handy in settings like this.) The background incandescent lighting resulted in a strong magenta/orange color cast, which dissipated with each additional exposure adjustment. Color looks good with the brighter exposures, though the slight color cast persists. We chose the +1.3 EV exposure adjustment for our main series because it had the best lighting on the model, though the white shirt is overexposed. The table of small thumbnails below shows exposure series from zero to +1.3 EV.0 EV1.3 EVExposure Compensation Settings:0 EV

1/ 40
F/ 2
(2641 k)0.3 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2644 k)0.7 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2692 k)1.0 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2697 k)1.3 EV
1/ 40
F/ 2
(2666 k)
Indoor Portrait, No Flash Auto White BalanceIncandescent White BalanceManual White Balance(2489 k)Manual white balance does well, but Auto and Incandescent do poorly. High noise, especially at ISO 400, but fairly fine-grained. Good job in Manual mode, but we'd like to see incandescent do better.This shot is always a very tough test of a camera's white balance capability, given the strong, yellowish color cast of the household incandescent bulbs used for the lighting, and the C-4040 produced good results with the Manual (2691 k) white balance setting. The Auto(1931 k) white balance setting was very orange, and the Incandescent(2005 k) setting produced a warm, sepia image. We selected an exposure adjustment of +1.3 EV for our main shot, which resulted in a good exposure with fairly accurate color. The blue flowers again show purplish tints, which is a common problem among digicams with this shot.Exposure Compensation Settings:0 EV
1/ 30
F/ 2
(2639 k)0.3 EV
1/ 25
F/ 2
(1920 k)0.6 EV
1/ 15
F/ 2
(1631 k)1.0 EV
1/ 15
F/ 2
(2688 k)1.3 EV
1/ 13
F/ 2
(2489 k)We shot a series of photos with the range of ISO settings the C4040 offers. The image noise was higher than we'd like to see in all cases (almost all blue-channel noise, surprisingly little red-channel), and was very high in the ISO 400 example. It is fairly fine-grained though, which makes it somewhat less objectionable. (We'd still like to see it lower though.)ISO Series:100 ISO
1/ 15
F/ 2
(1978 k)200 ISO
1/ 40
F/ 2
(1833 k)400 ISO
1/ 80
F/ 2
(1762 k)
House Shot (1856 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceVery good detail, very good color. Soft in the corners, but we'd give it a "very good" overall.Though the color balance is a hint magenta, we chose the Auto (1856 k) white balance setting for our main selection. The Manual (1898 k) setting produced very cool, greenish results, while the Daylight (1887 k) setting was much too warm. Detail looks great in the tree limbs and house front, with a slight softness at the corners of the frame. Noise is moderate in the roof shingles, and faintly noticeable in the window screens.
 Far-Field TestExcellent detail and sharpness, but the corners are a bit soft again. Loses the highlights, but does well in the shadows. Excellent fine-grained color& tone adjustments. Good job overall.This image is shot at infinity to test far-field lens performance. NOTE that this image cannot be directly compared to the other "house" shot, which is a poster, shot in the studio. The rendering of detail in the poster will be very different than in this shot, and color values (and even the presence or absence of leaves on the trees!) will vary in this subject as the seasons progress. In general though, you can evaluate detail in the bricks, shingles and window detail, and in the tree branches against the sky. Compression artifacts are most likely to show in the trim along the edge of the roof, in the bricks, or in the relatively "flat" areas in the windows.This is our ultimate "resolution shot," given the infinite range of detail in a natural scene like this. The C-4040 picked up great detail throughout the frame, though details are slightly soft, particularly in the corners. The fine foliage details are slightly softer than the perpendicular details of the house front, a common occurrence among digicams. We also measure a camera's dynamic range in this shot, and noticed that the C-4040 fell victim to the bright sunshine glare on the bay window, losing all but the strongest details. (And this was a somewhat hazy day, not as contrasty as this shot can be at times.) The shadow areas under the porch and in the shade of the tree (at right) fared slightly better, with fairly strong details visible in the brick and shrubbery patterns. The extreme contrast of the scene resulted in a slightly dim image as well. The table below shows our resolution and quality series, followed by ISO, contrast, sharpness, and white balance series. We also shot with the C-4040's two interpolated resolutions: 2,816 x 2,112 (3132 k) and 3,200 x 2,400 (5042 k) pixels.Resolution Series:Giant / Uncompressed
Note: Download and view in imaging software.
(11,357 k)Giant / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 5
(1906 k)Giant / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(837 k)
Large / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4
(1641 k)Large / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(672 k)
Medium1 / Fine
1/ 400
F/ 6.3
(1217 k)Medium1 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 5
(438 k)
Medium2 / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 5
(772 k)Medium2 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 5
(278 k)
Small / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4
(438 k)Small / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(179 k)
Tiny / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 4.5
(164 k)Tiny / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(72 k)ISO Series:ISO 100
1/ 800
F/ 4
(1985 k)ISO 200
1/ 650
F/ 7
(1825 k)ISO 400
1/ 650
F/ 10
(1846 k)The C4040 Zoom gives you *very* fine-grained control over contrast, with a range of +/- 5 steps up and down from the default. We've skipped over most here, showing just representative points along the range. Check the thumbnail page to see the full range, files C44FARCON01-11. Very handy, we like fine-grained adjustments like this, that allow you to really customize the camera to your own preferences.Contrast Series:Very Low
1/ 400
F/ 6.3
(836 k)Low
1/ 800
F/ 4
(798 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(827 k)High
1/ 650
F/ 5
(821 k)Very High
1/ 650
F/ 5
(834 k)The same story on in-camera sharpening, a total of 11 settings. We don't see as big a need for lots of sharpening settings, but still handy to have nonetheless. Same story as above, a few links below, see the thumbnail page for the rest. (C44FARS01-11)Sharpness Series:Very Low
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2102 k)Low
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(1929 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2105 k)High
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2134 k)Very High
1/ 800
F/ 3.2
(2212 k)
There's also a very broad range of adjustment available for the auto and preset white balance settings. The menu option lets you push the color toward red or blue, with 7 steps in either direction. To our eye, only the first couple are really useful, we'd prefer to see the same number of steps spread over a (much) narrower range. Kudos for including the adjustment though! Same story as above, a few links below, see the thumbnail page for the rest. (C44FARS01-11) - It'd be interesting to see what a strong blue tweak on the incandescent setting would do for the warm-tone problems we saw above. - Didn't have time to try this though...
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.47.32 | Message # 3
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Color Series:Very Red
1/ 800
F/ 4
(794 k)Red
1/ 800
F/ 4
(771 k)Normal
1/ 800
F/ 4
(817 k)Blue
1/ 800
F/ 4
(834 k)Very Blue
1/ 800
F/ 4
(862 k)
Lens Zoom RangeA pretty typical zoom range...We've received a number of requests from readers to take shots showing the lens focal length range of those cameras with zoom lenses. Thus, we're happy to present you here with the following series of shots, showing the field of view with the lens at full wide angle, the lens at full 3x telephoto, and the lens at full telephoto with 2x digital zoom enabled. The C-4040's lens covers a range equivalent to a 35-105mm zoom on a 35mm film camera. Following are the results at each zoom setting. Wide Angle
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(1296 k)3x Telephoto
1/ 650
F/ 2.6
(1316 k)2x Digital Zoom
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(967 k)
 Musicians Poster (1943 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceGood color in auto mode, good detail.For this test, we shot with the Auto (1943 k), Daylight (1956 k), and Manual (1960 k) white balance settings, choosing Auto as the most accurate. The Daylight came out rather warm, while the Manual setting produced a much cooler image with slightly pale, bluish skin tones. Color is good throughout the frame, with an accurate blue value on the Oriental model's robe (this blue has a tendency to go purple, a common problem with digicams, and we did notice slight purplish tints in the darker blue shades). Detail looks good throughout the frame, with a nice level of sharpness.
 Macro Shot (1813 k)Standard Macro ShotMacro with FlashGood close-up, excellent flash performance, for being this close!The C-4040 performed well in the macro category, capturing a minimum area of just 3.24 x 2.43 inches (82.22 x 61.66 millimeters). Resolution looks great, with nice detail in the coins and brooch, and color is reasonably accurate (though with a slight greenish cast). The flash (2012 k) did an excellent job throttling down for the macro area, with just a slight reflection in the large coin. (An unusually good job for a flash in macro mode.)
  "Davebox" Test Target (2396 k)Auto White BalanceDaylight White BalanceManual White BalanceGood color, but the reds and yellows are a little undersaturated. Excellent(!) shadow detail, low noise. Good overall.We shot samples of this target using the Auto (2450 k), Manual (2396 k), and Daylight (2466 k) white balance settings, choosing the Manual setting for our main image. (The Daylight shot was very warm, while the Auto shot had a slight magenta tint.) Exposure looks about right, as the overall colors are bright and the highlight details are strong. Color accuracy and saturation are good, though the large red and magenta color blocks appear cool. The C-4040 captured good detail in the shadows, with pretty low noise.
 Low-Light TestsVery good at low light, down to the limit of our test. Great for pictures of night scenes, dim interiors. Long-exposure noise reduction on the camera works very well.The C-4040 performed very well in the low-light category, and captured bright, usable images at light levels as low as 1/16 foot-candle (0.67 lux) at all three ISO settings. We shot with the camera's Noise Reduction setting at all light levels, which did an excellent job of decreasing the image noise. Interestingly, the shots taken at 1/16 foot-candle without Noise Reduction have a more accurate color balance, but the noise level is much higher. With Noise Reduction activated, we see practically no need for any noise removal software. The table below shows the best exposure we were able to obtain for each of a range of illumination levels. Images in this table (like all of our sample photos) are untouched, exactly as they came from the camera. Click here for sample images at ISO 100 (2301 k), 200 (2566 k), and 400 (2565 k) without Noise Reduction at the 1/16 foot-candle light level.1fc
11lux
1/2fc
5.5lux1/4fc
2.7lux
1/8fc
1.3lux
1/16fc
0.67lx
ISO
100

2,454.8 KB
1/ 1 secs
F2

2,500.0 KB
2 secs
F2

2,426.4 KB
5 secs
F2

2,298.4 KB
8 secs
F2

2,648.6 KB
16 secs
F2
ISO
200

1,838.0 KB
1/ 3 secs
F2

1,801.4 KB
1 secs
F2

1,892.1 KB
2.5 secs
F2

1,872.9 KB
5 secs
F2

2,045.8 KB
8 secs
F2
ISO
400

1,785.7 KB
1/ 6 secs
F2

1,783.0 KB
1/ 3 secs
F2

2,408.6 KB
1.3 secs
F2

2,358.1 KB
2.5 secs
F2

2,596.1 KB
4 secs
F2
 
Love high ISO photography? Hate noise? Check out Fred Miranda's ISO-R noise-reducing actions for Photoshop. Incredible noise reduction, with *no* loss of subject detail. (Pretty amazing, IMHO.) Check it out!


Flash Range TestFlash seems good out to the 14 foot limit of our test. (Very good)In our testing, we found the C-4040's flash bright and effective as far as 14 feet from the test target. Intensity decreased only slightly between the eight and 14 foot distances, noticeable mainly as a slight pinkish cast as the flash power dims. Below is our flash range series, with distances from eight to 14 feet from the target.8 ft9 ft10 ft11 ft12 ft13 ft14 ft
2,145.9 KB
1/ 800
F2.3

2,185.6 KB
1/ 650
F2.3

2,080.9 KB
1/ 500
F2.3

2,045.8 KB
1/ 500
F2.3

1,835.7 KB
1/ 400
F2.6

1,788.9 KB
1/ 400
F2.6

1,730.4 KB
1/ 320
F2.6

 ISO-12233 (WG-18) Resolution Test (1988 k)Strong detail to 1,100 lines (good). More than average barrel distortion at wide angle though, and a bit more chromatic aberration than we like to see, in the far corners, at wide angle.The C-4040 performed well on our "laboratory" resolution test chart. It started showing artifacts in the test patterns at resolutions as low as 700 lines per picture height, in both horizontal and vertical directions. We found "strong detail" out to at least 1,100 lines. "Extinction" of the target patterns didn't occur until about 1,300 lines. We also shot at the interpolated 2,816 x 2,112- (3462 k) and 3,200 x 2,400-pixel (4141 k) resolutions, noticing slightly softer details and decreased resolution.Optical distortion on the C-4040 is higher than average at the wide angle end, as we measured an approximate 0.91 percent barrel distortion. The telephoto end fared much better, as we found only one pixel of pincushion distortion. Chromatic aberration is moderate, showing about two or three pixels of coloration on both sides of the target lines, which are somewhat distorted from the slight corner softness. While only a couple of pixels in breadth, there's more color there than we like to see. (This distortion is visible as a very slight colored fringe around the objects at the edges of the field of view on the resolution target.)Resolution Series, Wide AngleGiant / Uncompressed
Note: Download and view in imaging software.
(11,357 k)Giant / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.6
(1988 k)Giant / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(760 k)
Large / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(2166 k)Large / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(586 k)
Medium1 / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(1046 k)Medium1 / Normal
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(371 k)
Medium2 / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(741 k)Medium2 / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(225 k)
Small / Fine
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(431 k)Small / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(146 k)
Tiny / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.8
(132 k)Tiny / Normal
1/ 650
F/ 2.8
(64 k)Resolution Series, TelephotoGiant / Fine
1/ 800
F/ 2.6
(2452 k)
Viewfinder Accuracy/Flash Uniformity


Average optical VF accuracy, excellent LCD accuracy. Flash is uneven at wide angle, excellent at telephoto.The C-4040's optical viewfinder was a little tight, showing approximately 83 percent frame accuracy at wide angle, and about 85 percent at telephoto. The LCD monitor fared much better, showing approximately 98 percent of the image area at wide angle, and almost exactly 100 percent at telephoto. Since we generally like to see LCD monitors as close to 100 percent accuracy as possible, the C-4040 did an excellent job here. Flash distribution is rather uneven at the wide angle setting (though bright), with slight falloff along in the corners. At the telephoto setting, flash distribution is even, though the intensity is dimmer. 

Wide Angle (Optical)
1/ 200
F/ 1.8
(2528 k)
Telephoto (Optical)
1/ 100
F/ 2.6
(2681 k)
Wide Angle (LCD)
1/ 200
F/ 1.8
(2255 k)
Telephoto (LCD)
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(2638 k)
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 02.53.49 | Message # 4
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Sitting in front of a monitor all day (and all night for some of us) can make you lose sight of important current events such as the changing of the seasons. Fortunately, if you don't get out much, you can tell what time of year it is by the product releases you read. Motherboards? Must be Springtime (Computex). Game consoles? Must be time to do some Xmas shopping (online, of course). Well, it must be summer because we're seeing gads of new digital cameras coming out (a lot of folks take vacations this time of year, right?). Here's another: Olympus just let us know about its CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM digital camera. It has a 4 Megapixel CCD (similar to Toshiba's PDR-M81 ), an F1.8 3X zoom lens, and image quality and noise reduction technologies to let you print photos as large as 16" x 20". Other features include auto and manual white balance, multiple exposure settings, a two-frame-per-second burst mode, QuickTime Movie capabilities, black and white and sepia shooting modes, auto exposure bracketing (AEB), and several compression settings. The CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM will be available in August with an estimated street price of $1099. It ships with a 16MB Olympus SmartMedia memory card, USB cable, AV cable, two 3V lithium battery packs (CR-3V), lens cap and retainer cord, remote control, Olympus Camedia Master 2.5 Utility Software for image manipulation and creation, instruction manual, QuickStart Guide, lens cap, and strap. Now, slather yourself in SPF 30 and go smell the roses.
Read at: https://www.tomshardware.co.uk/olympus-camedia-c,news-3767.html
 
adminDate: Tuesday, 20.08.2019, 03.12.13 | Message # 5
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12 PM GMT: Olympus has today announced the new C-4040Z. Based on the popular and successful C-3040Z / C-3030Z body and design the new C-4040Z increases the pixel count with the new 1/1.8" 4.1 megapixel CCD we've seen on Sony's DSC-S85. It has the same F1.8 - F2.6, 3x optical zoom lens as used on the C-3040Z (though now with a rubber barrel grip). There's also now the addition of a 7.7 megapixel interpolated mode (in-camera) and a noise reduction system. Burst shooting speed is 2 frames per second for up to 8 images. Street price $1099.
(Scroll down - below specifications for the Press Release).
Olympus C-4040Z Specifications
Sensor1/1.8" 4.1 megapixel CCD (effective 3.98 megapixels)Image Sizes2272 x 1704, 2048 x 1536, 1600 x 1200, 1280 x 960, 1024 x 768, 640 x 480"Englargement Mode"3200 x 2400, 2816 x 2112Image QualityTIFF, JPEG (three levels)Lens3x optical zoom (35 - 105 mm equiv.), F1.8 - F2.6Digital ZoomSmooth up to 2.5xMeteringESP, Spot, Multi-SpotExposure modesProgrammed Auto, Aperture Priority Auto, Shutter Priority AutoExposure compensation+/-2 EV in 0.3 EV stepsShutter speedsAuto: 1 - 1/800 sec
Manual: 16 - 1/800 secApertureWide: F1.8 - F10 (1/3 EV steps)
Tele: F2.5 - F10 (1/3 EV steps)Exposure bracketing3 or 5 images in 0.3, 0.7 or 1.0 EV stepsFocusingTTL "iESP" contrast detection, Manual focusFocus rangeNormal: 0.8 m - Infinity
Macro: 0.2 - 0.8mSensitivityAuto, ISO 100, 200, 400ViewfinderOpticalLCD1.8", 114,000 pixelsFlashInternal, range: Wide: 0.8 - 5.6 m, Tele: 0.2 - 3.8 mFlash modesAuto (automatic activation in low and backlight), Red-eye reduction, Off (no flash), Fill-in (forced activation). Slow synchronization (first-curtain synchronization effect, second-curtain synchronization effect) External terminal: Off, Auto, Forced activation.External flashYes, Olympus proprietary terminalBurst mode2 fps up to 8 frames (HQ mode)Self timer12 secondsPower4 x AA batteries or 2 x CR-V3 LithiumDimensions110 x 76 x 70 mm (4.33 x 2.99 x 2.75 in)Weight (no batt.)320 g (11.3 oz)Good news! State Street Direct, our official affiliate are now taking pre-orders for
the C-4040Z. You can order yours today.


All orders contribute to the upkeep of this site.
Press release:
OLYMPUS ANNOUNCES THE NEW CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM 4 MEGAPIXEL DIGITAL CAMERAFeatures Latest CCD, Super Bright Lens and Noise Reduction Technology for High Quality Digital Photos up to 16" x 20"

June 20, 2001, Melville, NY — Olympus America, Inc., the world leader in film and filmless photography, today announced the CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM. Establishing a new high-end category for Olympus C-Series cameras, the C-4040 ZOOM builds on the foundation of Olympus’ award winning C-Series digital cameras while incorporating exciting new features. The C-4040 ZOOM offers a 4 Megapixel CCD, a super-bright F1.8 high-performance 3X zoom lens, plus the latest in Olympus image quality and noise reduction technologies to deliver crisp high-quality prints as large as 16" x 20".

The C-4040 is the perfect digital camera for photographers desiring extensive image control capabilities combined with ease of use for creative and artistic applications. Professional photographers will also find the C-4040 ZOOM to be a versatile yet compact solution providing the image quality and output sizes required for magazine and newspaper publication.

Its high-performance 3X zoom lens offers a large aperture that opens to a maximum F1.8 aperture setting for low light photography. Combined with its extended flash working range, the C-4040 ZOOM is a great camera for any low-light shooting situation. Simple to use, the C-4040 ZOOM also features Olympus’ USB Auto-Connect capabilities for fast and worry-free downloading without the need for any additional software or drivers.

Similar in design to other Olympus C-Series models, the C-4040 ZOOM has an elegant all-black finish and rich ornamental parts that complement new ergonomic controls, including a rubberized lens barrel and grip. The C-4040 ZOOM also retains many popular features found in the C-Series, such as Auto and Manual White Balance, multiple exposure settings to compensate for different lighting conditions, a two-frame-per-second Burst Mode, QuickTime Movie, black and white and sepia shooting modes, Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB), and several compression settings.

New Features of the C-4040 ZOOM include:
  • Noise Reduction System – The noise reduction system allows for +/- 5-step sharpness and contrast control for clearer, more precise images. The camera compares similar images and uses that information to minimize background noise in pictures, even during long exposures or in low light conditions
  • Super Bright Lens – From wide-angle to telephoto settings, the new super-bright 7.1 - 21.3mm 3X zoom lens (35-105mm equivalent in 35mm photography) captures images with unrivaled precision. The 3X optical zoom also allows offers a seamless 7.5X digital zoom to get even closer to the action. The lens permits users to take shallower depth of field images for greater portrait photo opportunities and more freedom in low-light situations.
  • Optimum Image Enlargement Mode - Enlarges images up to 3200 x 2400 pixels in SHQ or HQ mode. The C-4040 ZOOM uses a bicubic algorithm and a new high-speed ASIC chip to maximize image quality and processing speed to create sharp, crisp pictures as large as 16" x 20".
  • Superior Image Quality – A 4.1 megapixel CCD and advanced imaging technology create exceptionally sharp, crisp high-resolution pictures.
  • User Friendly Interface – A streamlined menu with user-selectable shortcut menus and custom buttons make the camera easy to navigate and program.
  • USB Auto-Connect - Connect to any USB-compatible Windows computer (running Windows Me or 2000) or Macintosh (running MacOS 8.6+) for easy downloading of image files to computers without any additional software.
  • Designed Menu Navigation System – Never miss another moment fumbling through layers of camera settings. Custom buttons and shortcut settings make adjustments quick and easy.
  • Ruggedized Lens Barrel – The new ruggedized rubber grip around the lens barrel provides for surer handling in any weather condition, and protects the lens even without a cap. A tethered line ensures the lens cap is never lost when one is used.

Standard features of the C-4040 include:
  • Spot AF Function - A Spot AutoFocus function allows the camera to focus on points specifically selected by the photographer.
  • White Balance – Get exacting control over white balance settings in any lighting condition and ensure proper color reproduction. The iESP multi-patterned white balance system automatically adjusts system settings to deliver the best image quality, or select one of the four manual white balance presets for more precise control. In addition, a new +/-3 step white balance correction function enables minor adjustments in color tones.
  • Metering Modes - The C-4040 ZOOM offers users a choice of ESP multi-patterned metering and spot metering for easy, yet advanced exposure control. The ESP multi-pattern meter looks at a variety of areas in the subject area for proper overall exposure. Spot metering allows for pinpoint control of subject exposure using only the very center of the image area. The C-4040 ZOOM also includes a new Multi-Spot metering mode that combines up to eight spot reading positions and averages them together for total control over subject exposure. The C-4040 ZOOM’s versatile metering capabilities make it one of the most advanced models in the field of 4 Megapixel cameras.
  • Sharpness and Contrast Settings – Get the best possible pictures every time. Flexible sharpness and contrast controls let the photographer take full control of final output quality. Soft, Normal and Hard Sharpness settings adjust the definition around the subject to meet any need. Low to High Contrast control regulates dark and light areas to capture any image with just the right amount of contrast and depth.
  • QuickTime Movie with Sound - QuickTime Movie mode allows users to capture up to 120 seconds of video with simultaneously recorded sound. For still images, the C-4040 ZOOM lets users record a 4-second audio attachment, ideal for voice memos. Audio may be re-recorded over images, with functionality supported by Olympus’ CAMEDIA Master software.
 

Accessories

Olympus provides a wide range of optional accessories for the C-4040 ZOOM including a camera case; FL-40 external flash for synchronized shooting with TTL cable and bracket; an assortment of lenses from 28mm to 152mm equivalent; RM-1 remote control; NiMH batteries and charger; C7AU AC adapter.

The CAMEDIA C-4040 ZOOM will be available August 2001 with an estimated street price of $1099. It ships with an 16MB Olympus SmartMedia™ memory card, USB cable, AV cable, two 3V lithium battery packs (CR-3V), lens cap and retainer cord, remote control, Olympus Camedia Master 2.5 Utility Software for image manipulation and creation, instruction manual, QuickStart Guide, lens cap and strap.

C-4040 ZOOM Street Price $1099.

More Links about C-4040
http://olympuscanada.com/cpg_sec....mp;fl=4
https://www.yodot.com/mac-pho....om.html
http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Olympus_C-4000_Zoom
 
Forum » EQUIPMENT » Digital Cameras » Olympus Camedia C-4040 Zoom (All about C-4040 if you have more information about comment.)
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